363 lecture 3-2008 - what is biodiversity

363 lecture 3-2008 - what is biodiversity - Read for...

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Read for Monday Chapter 3 in Primack Read for Wednesday Chapter 7 in Primack (skip p. 146-50) CONS670: look at this paper McGarvey, D. J. 2007. Merging precaution with sound science under the Endangered Species Act. BioScience 57(1):65-70.
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ASSOCIATED PRESS 1:34 p.m. January 28, 2007 LOS ANGELES – Fish caught off Los Angeles County's coast still contain high levels of banned DDT decades after a manufacturer dumped tons of the pesticide into sewers, creating a toxic plume on the ocean bottom. There has been no improvement since the last regional fish survey was conducted in the late 1980s, according to a federal survey based on data collected mainly in 2002 but only recently released. The data has prompted the state to reevaluate the risk of eating the locally caught fish. There already is a commercial fishing ban in the contamination area. DDT was banned in the United States in 1972 after it was classified as a probable carcinogen, and has been linked to liver disease and reproductive damage. Montrose Chemical Co. manufactured DDT from 1947 to 1971, releasing about 2,000 tons of the pesticide into sewers that flowed to the ocean. DDT adheres to sediment and continues to infect marine creatures. The contamination covers several square miles of the ocean floor near the Palos Verdes Peninsula.
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1/5 of Arctic polar bears rely on sea ice in this area.
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Bush Administration to Miss Deadline for Polar Bear Endangered Species Act Listing Environmental Groups will Return to Court to Enforce Deadline WASHINGTON (January 7, 2008) – In response to the Bush administration’s announcement that it will not meet Wednesday’s deadline to issue a final Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing determination for the polar bear due to global warming, environmental groups announced their intent to go back to court to enforce the deadline. The administration was required by law to make its decision by Wednesday following its proposal one year ago, but today announced “we expect to…finalize the decision within the next month.” The Center for Biological Diversity, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Greenpeace will begin legal action Wednesday with a formal notice to sue as required by the Endangered Species Act. “We certainly hope that the polar bear will be listed within the next month. But this is an administration of broken promises, from Bush’s campaign pledge to regulate greenhouse gases to Secretary Kempthorne’s failure to list a single species under the Endangered Species Act in the last 607 days,” said Kassie Siegel, climate program director at the Center for Biological Diversity, and lead author of the 2005 petition.
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2008 for the course BSCI 363 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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363 lecture 3-2008 - what is biodiversity - Read for...

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