363 lecture 7-2008- Pleistocene extinctions

363 lecture 7-2008- Pleistocene extinctions - Legacy of...

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Unformatted text preview: Legacy of Radiation Illness Stirs Objection to Nevada Bomb Test Blast Won't Be Nuclear, but Many Fear Contaminated Dust http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/06/AR2007020601606.html The Pentagon plans to test a 700-ton ammonium-nitrate-and-fuel-oil "bunker buster" weapon on the Nevada Test Site, a 1,375-square-mile chunk of desert. Divine Strake will demonstrate the impact on deeply buried tunnels should a U.S. complex be attacked, or should the United States attack a bunker in another country. At a series of emotional meetings last month in Las Vegas, St. George, Salt Lake City and the Idaho capital of Boise, people who live downwind of the Nevada Test Site expressed fear that if the government goes ahead with its code-named Divine Strake test, radioactive dust from previous tests will blow their way. (downwinders) Threatened bird species nesting site found PHNOM PENH, Feb. 7 (UPI) -- Cambodian conservationists have found Southeast Asia's only known breeding colony of slender-billed vultures -- one of the world's most threatened birds. The colony, discovered in a heavily forested area east of the Mekong River in Cambodia's Stung Treng Province, also represents one of the last chances for recovery of the species, now listed as "Critically Endangered" by the World Conservation Union. http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Science/20070207-091449-1843r/ Elk Herds Upsetting Ecosystems In Parks Officials Favor Shooting to Restore Natural Balance By Peter Slevin Washington Post Staff Writer Monday, February 11, 2008; Page A03 Elk like to eat. Elk like to eat a lot. This is a problem for creatures fond of the same greenery coveted by the weighty elk. It is not so good for the ecosystem, either, according to the stewards of three national parks in Colorado and the Dakotas that are faced with growing herds of the herbivorous mammals. Scientists at Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota are preparing to do an elk count, sending an airplane aloft after a fresh snow, when it is easier to spot the quarry in rugged terrain. "Based on last year's survey, we expect to see a thousand or so elk," said Bill Whitworth, the park's chief of resource management. "We'd like to have somewhere between 100 and 400. We're balancing our elk population with bison, feral horses, other deer and animals that use the forage out here." Reading assignment For 2/11: Chapter 10: Overexploitation For 2/13: Chapter 8: Vulnerability For 2/15: Chapter 9: Habitat destruction Homework Assignment #1: Due Monday, February 18 Identify an animal population, and learn a little about it...
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363 lecture 7-2008- Pleistocene extinctions - Legacy of...

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