363 lecture 11-2008 - Demography

363 lecture 11-2008 - Demography - Government abandons bid...

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Unformatted text preview: Government abandons bid to save US jaguars The US government will not attempt to save jaguars from extinction within the formal system of the Endangered Species Act. The jaguar ( Panthera onca , pictured) once ranged across the southern United States, but later essentially vanished, with the exception of a few males that have been seen slinking through New Mexico and Arizona during the past few decades. These outliers, according to a decision released on 17 January by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, do not justify a formal recovery plan. The agency says that it will instead work on behalf of the endangered cat with other countries south of the border that comprise the rest of the animal's range. What is really important is to focus on the jaguars where they are, says Elizabeth Slown, spokeswoman for the agency's southwest office in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I don't want people to think we are abandoning the jaguar. Environmental groups say the government is doing just that. Kieran Suckling, policy director of the Arizona-based Center for Biological Diversity in Tucson, called the move a death sentence. Deforested mountain area in Haiti Wolf advocates to fight plans to shoot park elk By Bill Scanlon , Rocky Mountain News ( Contact ) Originally published 08:51 a.m., February 18, 2008 A wolf-advocacy group said today it will sue Rocky Mountain National Park over its decision to hire sharpshooters to kill up to 200 elk a year at Rocky Mountain National Park as a way to handle overpopulation. The decision was made in December, but signed Friday by Mike Snyder, Intermountain Director for the National Park Service. A WildEarth Guardians officer today said federal officials didn't take a fair look at introducing wolves to the park as an alternative way to keep the elk population down. Elk there are an estimated 2,000 in the park -- are destroying aspen and willows in large stretches on the eastern part of the Continental Divide, threatening to decimate large areas of the river-bank ecosystem. The Park Service says shooting of elk will be part of a plan that also includes fences, restoring trees and redistributing the elk. But Rob Edward, director for carnivore recovery for the Santa Fe, N.M.-based WildEarth Guardians, said 30 or 40 wolves could accomplish the same goals in a more natural way. Pandemic Human Viruses Cause Decline of Endangered Great Apes (Human sniffles kill endangered chimps) Commercial hunting and habitat loss are major drivers of the rapid decline of great apes. Ecotourism and research have been widely promoted as a means of providing alternative value for apes and their habitats. However, close contact between humans and habituated apes during ape tourism and research has raised concerns that disease transmission risks might outweigh benefits. To date only bacterial and parasitic infections of typically low virulence have been shown to move from humans to wild apes....
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2008 for the course BSCI 363 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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363 lecture 11-2008 - Demography - Government abandons bid...

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