363 lecture 12-2008 - genetics 1

363 lecture 12-2008 - genetics 1 - Dolphin dies during Navy...

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Dolphin dies during Navy SoCal sonar exercises The Associated Press Article Launched: 02/22/2008 02:17:20 AM PST LOS ANGELES—A dolphin died on a beach during Navy sonar training exercises but it was not immediately clear what caused its death, authorities said. The female northern right whale dolphin died at the end of January on San Nicolas Island, a Navy-owned island off the Southern California coast. At the time, the Navy's Third Fleet was conducting training that included sonar use. Environmental groups have sued to limit naval sonar use that they fear can harm marine mammals.
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Farallon de Medinilla hosts breeding colonies of great frigatebirds; masked, red-footed, and brown boobys; red- and white-tailed tropicbirds; white and sooty terns; brown and black noddys; and other species of migratory seabirds. Farallon de Medinilla is one of only two small breeding colonies of the great frigatebird in the Mariana island chain, and is also the largest known nesting site for masked boobies in the Mariana and Caroline islands. Masked booby Great frigatebird
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The Farallon de Medinilla Target Range is the Pacific Fleet’s only U.S.- controlled range available for live-fire training for forward deployed naval forces. Farallon de Medinilla plays a special and unique role in national defense. Its location provides access frequency that supports established training requirements. In addition, the air and sea space in the Farallon provides sufficient room for the many different attack profiles necessary to replicate training opportunities in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands [CNMI]. American fighter pilots must maintain capability and proficiency in precision-guided arms and specific target engagement. These are perishable skills that require frequent access to high fidelity, scenario-based targets. Accessibility to the Farallon de Medinilla supports these requirements. The Farallon de Medinilla, an uninhabited 200-acre island, stands about 280 feet above sea level and its size is approximately 3 miles by 1/2 mile. The Farallon de Medinilla Target Range is located about 150 miles north of Guam and is leased from the Government of the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands.
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The 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act prohibits harm to migratory species without a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1996 The Navy asked the Service for a permit to use the island as a range, but was refused. The Navy continued to use the range, saying the treaty did not apply to federal agencies. Fish and Wildlife surveys have shown that birds are being killed when the military hits island with bombs, missiles, rockets, naval guns and other weapons. The Navy has said targets are placed away from primary bird habitat, and the Navy is budgeting $100,000 annually to enhance bird habitats on neighboring islands. The military has been using FDM for live-fire training, during which
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363 lecture 12-2008 - genetics 1 - Dolphin dies during Navy...

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