363 lecture 23-2008, ETIB

363 lecture 23-2008, ETIB - In normal Arctic conditions, a...

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In normal Arctic conditions, a large fraction of the sea ice cover in February is several years old, left. A major melt last summer left expanses of open water not seen in at least a century. Colder-than-normal temperatures restored ice over much of the area by February of this year, right, but most of the winter sea ice cover just froze in the past year (the red regions). That is significant because younger ice is generally thinner and more vulnerable to melting again when summer returns.
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A North Island brown kiwi has been born at the National Zoo, a notable event because the bird is one of the world's most endangered species. The chick hatched at the zoo's Bird House early on March 7 after the chick's father incubated the egg for a month and keepers incubated it for another five weeks, zoo officials said.
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Satellite images of the site of the Lomas de Aparicio monarch colony in Mexico taken on March 22, 2004, left, and February 23, 2008, right. Areas that were green and are now brown have been logged.
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Sarcophilus
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Facial tumors on Tasmanian Devils Devil facial tumor disease, facilitated by lack of genetic variation because of a
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Federal Judge Orders Return of Endangered Species Protection for Bald Eagle in Arizona PHOENIX, Ariz .— The Center for Biological Diversity and Maricopa Audubon have won a federal district court lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to continue Endangered Species Act protection for the desert nesting bald eagle, found mostly in Arizona. The victory resulted from challenge of the Service’s 2006 rejection of a 2004 petition to increase protection for the eagle and its habitat and from a challenge to the agency’s nationwide effort to remove Endangered Species Act protection from all bald eagles. On March 5, 2008, Federal District Judge Mary Murguia reversed the Service’s 2006 decision, calling it “arbitrary and capricious, and contrary to law.” She reinstated Endangered Species Act protection for the eagle and its habitat in Arizona and ordered the Fish and Wildlife Service to complete a reevaluation of its 2006 decision within nine months.
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Only about 50 breeding pairs of desert nesting bald eagles survive. They are reproductively, geographically, biologically, and behaviorally distinct from all other bald eagle populations and occupy uniquely hot and dry habitat. Unique populations and their habitat qualify for Endangered Species Act protection with a designation as a “distinct population segment.” In 2004, the Center and Maricopa filed a petition requesting increased protection for the bald eagle in Arizona. The petition was based on evidence of increasing threats to habitat and presentation of data from a previously suppressed Arizona Game and Fish Department study demonstrating likely extinction of nesting bald eagles from Arizona within the next 57 and 82 years. Increasing habitat threats represent the gravest risk to nesting
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2008 for the course BSCI 363 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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363 lecture 23-2008, ETIB - In normal Arctic conditions, a...

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