363 lecture 25-2008, threats to biodiversity

363 lecture 25-2008, threats to biodiversity - Rock Creek...

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Rock Creek Fish Head Home Again With Obstacles Removed, Herring Return to Spawning Area Washington Post Saturday, March 31, 2007; Page A01 A fish ladder, right, installed next to the waterfall created by a dam near Peirce Mill, allows the migratory fish to climb one tier at a time. The ladder is a series of small steps, each with a spot for fish to rest before going on to the next.
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D.C. Fisheries and Wildlife biologists Luke Lyon and Eric Thadey wade down Rock Creek below Peirce Mill. They used a device to temporarily shock fish so they can be collected, examined and then released.
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Patrick DiNicola, environmental mitigation manager for the Wilson Bridge project, uses an observation window installed in the upper level of the Peirce Mill fish ladder to search for migrating fish.
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This alewife, one of many collected below Peirce Mill waterfall, measured 12 inches long. The restoration process has opened about 28 new miles of the stream, extending all the way to Lake Needwood near Rockville.
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Spring 2005 was a banner year for the sea lamprey in Maryland. Reports of sea lampreys, Petromyzon marinus, have been received from all Maryland western shore drainages from the Potomac to the Susquehanna. Surprising for many anglers, this is a native species and is anadromous like shad and striped bass meaning they grow to maturity at sea and return to spawn in fresh water during the spring. The adults will often run as far up a river as the can and can be found at the base of dams, as is the case this year on the Gunpowder River.
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Syllabus I. Conservation biology: Philosophy and definitions II. Extinctions past and present III. Genetics of conservation and extinction IV. Demography of conservation and extinction V. The ecology of conservation and extinction VI. Major threats to biodiversity Exam on 13 April will cover material from lecture 15 to 29; review in class on 11 April
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Marine litter plastics break down very slowly: up to 50 years. And they are buoyant, so they easily arrive in oceans. Don't settle out. major sources: human garbage, fishing nets (ghost nets) and gear, cargo‑ related stuff ingested plastic kills marine mammals plastics found in the digestive tracts of 25% of sea birds sampled in one study aesthetic problems
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Plastic found in the digestive track of a dead sea turtle
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ENVIRONMENT Throng Takes On the Anacostia Cleanup Organizers Urge Politicians to Take the Next Step By Paul Schwartzman Washington Post Staff Writer Sunday, April 1, 2007; Page C05 The Anacostia, which snakes its way through the heart of redevelopment projects in the District, including the new Washington Nationals stadium, has long been ravaged by a mix of sewage, refuse and toxic chemicals. An estimated 20,000 tons of garbage float downstream annually, much of the junk
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2008 for the course BSCI 363 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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363 lecture 25-2008, threats to biodiversity - Rock Creek...

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