363 lecture 30-2008, biodiversity management2

363 lecture 30-2008, biodiversity management2 - What is a...

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Unformatted text preview: What is a Habitat Conservation Plan? A Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) is a land use plan that allows landowners to obtain an "incidental take permit" for species that are listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in return for conservation commitments. Incidental take permits allow landowners to carry out specified economic activities on their land that destroy habitats or otherwise harm, or "take," threatened or endangered species. HCP (A Preliminary Review) Graduate seminars (106 students, 8 Universities) Are data sufficient to support actions outlined in plan? Data collected for 208 HCPs, Intensive analysis of 43 HCPs species biology threats to the species prescribed management actions monitoring and plan administration the criteria against which recovery would be measured HCP Effectiveness % Sufficient Adequacy in addressing primary threat 57% Adequacy in minimizing impacts 52% HCP & Cons. Biol. (97 spp.) Category of Theory (Impact Assessment) Genetics Popn. Behav. ETIB Comm. Ecosystem Expert Opinion 4 9 9 7 5 Qualitative 1 9 11 5 11 2 Limited Quantitative 1 17 3 3 5 2 Quantitative 2 18 7 5 12 13 Quantitative Model 1 Times Theory Used 8 44 30 22 35 23 What areas are the most important for preserving species? Hot Spots (Conservation International) To qualify as a hotspot, an area must contain at least 1,500 of the world's 300,000 plant species and lost 70% or more of its primary vegetation Myers, N., et al. 2000. Biodiversity hotspots for conservation priorities. Nature 403 :853-858. http://www.biodiversityhotspots.org/xp/Hotspots/hotspotsScience/ How to set priorities? Hot Spots? 25 hotspots contain the sole remaining habitats of 44% of the Earth's plant species and 35% of its vertebrate species, and these habitats face a high risk of elimination. 1.4/% of total land surface An aggregate expanse of 800,767 square kilometres, 38% of the hotspots total, is already protected in parks and reserves Myers, N., et al. 2000. Biodiversity hotspots for conservation priorities. Nature 403 :853-858. Conservation Science > Ecoregions (WWF) An ecoregion is defined as a large area of land or water that contains a geographically distinct assemblage of natural communities that (a) share a large majority of their species and ecological dynamics; (b) share similar environmental conditions, and; (c) interact ecologically in ways that are critical for their long-term persistence. (c) interact ecologically in ways that are critical for their long-term persistence....
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363 lecture 30-2008, biodiversity management2 - What is a...

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