363 lecture 31-2008, ESA1

363 lecture 31-2008, ESA1 - Expect Fewer Crabs for Dinner...

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Expect Fewer Crabs for Dinner this Year ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Maryland will cut its female blue crab harvest up to 40 percent this year to address fears the crabs are reaching dangerously low levels in the Chesapeake Bay. A draft of proposed regulations released Wednesday laid out plans by Maryland fisheries regulators to protect full-grown females, which biologists say are needed to replenish the Chesapeake's population. The plans include lowering bushel limits on female crabs, or even closing Maryland's mature female crab harvest in April and May. The regulations will be reviewed by crabbers before becoming final. Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine are scheduled to announce more changes to the crab harvest nest week. Virginia has already announced tighter limits in that state's waters, such as a larger sanctuary and new limits on winter dredging. The regulations come after a decade of low harvest numbers in Maryland and Virginia. The states coordinate a wintertime dredge survey to estimate the Chesapeake's crab population, and those surveys show the crabs have been hovering near dangerous lows for years. Fisheries regulators say the harvest should slashed baywide until the population reaches safer levels. Maryland's draft released Wednesday sets a goal of allowing crabbers to take 46 percent of the total stock per year. That would require harvest cutbacks of 20 percent to 40 percent.
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Edge Effects Beetle species in New Zealand 90% respond to edge effects Abundance of 20% is influenced >250 m inside a forest boundary Abundance of 1 in 8 is influenced 1000 m inside the boundary Even 1 km inside forest, beetle communities differed in species richness, β-diversity (spatial turnover), and composition from the deep forest interior
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Megafishes Project Document large freshwater fish About 24 species that can top 200 pounds or 6 feet in length National Geographic Society is funding Zeb Hogan checks a receiver for tracking a tagged giant catfish in the Mekong River, between Laos and Thailand
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Moby Dick of the Mekong. Caught in 2005, this record giant catfish weighed 293 kilograms. $15/kg in the marketplace.
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This giant freshwater stingray measured 2 meters in width and 4 meters from stem to stern; fishers claim to have seen stingrays twice that size.
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Protecting megafishes will require more research and in some cases litigation, says Donald Stewart, seen here with arapaima harvested by fishers in Brazil's Mamirauá Reserve. Up to 3m, 200kg
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Exam on Wednesday 16 April Will cover lectures 17-29 Read p. 449-462 in text for lectures about the ESA
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Outline Biodiversity Management Modern Approaches Legal approaches: ESA and CITES Keystone Species Hotspots GAP HCP Human Conflicts
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1) designation of endangered species - endangered (in danger of extinction) - threatened (likely to become endangered) (subspecies or distinct populations) 2) designation of critical habitat for endangered species 3) development and implementation of recovery plans
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363 lecture 31-2008, ESA1 - Expect Fewer Crabs for Dinner...

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