363 lecture 32-2008, ESA2

363 lecture 32-2008, ESA2 - ESA For success stories see...

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ESA For success stories, see: http://www.edf.org/pubs/Reports/Road2Recovery/ Wilcove, D.S. et al. 1996. Rebuilding the Ark: Toward a More Effective Endangered Species Act for Private Land. Environmental Defense Fund
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Species removed from the ESA list Brown Pelican – 1985 American alligator – 1987 Arctic peregrine falcon – 1994 Gray whale – 1994 American peregrine falcon – 1999 Aleutian Canada Goose – 2001 Bald eagle – 2007 Gray wolf – some in 2008
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Judge Suspends Administration Rules For Managing Forests Washington Post Saturday, March 31, 2007; Page A02 A federal district judge ruled yesterday that the Bush administration illegally rewrote the rules for managing 192 million acres of federally owned forests and grasslands in 2005 and must consider the environmental impact of its plan before offering another policy blueprint. The ruling suspends the forest rules the administration adopted on Jan. 5, 2005. Hamilton said the government did not adequately assess the policy's impact on wildlife and the environment and did not give sufficient public notice of the "paradigm shift" that the rule put in place. The judge ordered the Forest Service to suspend its 2005 rule and subject it to a new round of analysis, taking into account the environmental protections and public participation requirements in the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act and the Administrative Procedures Act. The battle between environmental groups and the administration over the forest rules has raged for several years. It centers on changes to environmental protections that had been in place since the Reagan administration. Under the old policy, the government had to maintain viable populations of native wildlife in forests and monitor some populations regularly, while limiting logging and drilling for oil and gas. The new rule -- which gave economic activities as high a priority as maintaining the forest's ecological health -- made it easier to conduct drilling and logging in national forests while weakening protections for native fish and wildlife. It also accelerated the process for approving forest management plans, which can drag on for as long as seven years, thereby cutting planning costs.
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International Policy Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Prevents trade in globally endangered species or their products. Developed in 1973, by 1994 122 countries Appendix I: 675 species Appendix II: 3,700 animal species, 21,000 plants OSA, OMA in the US FWS
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CITES Roughly 5,000 species of animals and 28,000 species of plants are protected by CITES against over-exploitation through international trade. They are listed in the three CITES Appendices. The species are grouped in the Appendices according to
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2008 for the course BSCI 363 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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363 lecture 32-2008, ESA2 - ESA For success stories see...

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