363 Lecture 37 - 2008

363 Lecture 37 - 2008 - Coal Does More Than Keep the Lights...

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Coal Does More Than Keep the Lights On Some communities in West Virginia say Washingtonians are  unaware of the true cost of "mountaintop" mining. The D.C. region, with its need for electricity skyrocketing, has  been burning steadily more coal, buying almost a third of its  supply from this part of Appalachia.
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Biologists say the effects can fall even harder on the environment, suffocating the life in  Appalachian streams.  "It destroys the streams. I mean, it eradicates them. It's dead. It's gone," said Margaret  Palmer, head of the University of Maryland's Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. 
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U.S.-MEXICAN BORDER  Researchers Fear Southern Fence Will Endanger Species Further TUCSON -- The debate over the fence the United States is building along its southern  border has focused largely on the project's costs, feasibility and how well it will curb  illegal immigration. But one of its most lasting impacts may well be on the animals and  vegetation that make this politically fraught landscape their home. The scientists cite examples such as the 70 remaining Sonoran pronghorns in Arizona's  Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge. They are the only remaining population on U.S.  soil, and the five surveillance towers that the administration plans to build in the area will  be in the middle of the pronghorns' range, producing noise and human activity that would  disturb the sensitive species.  An interagency team of scientists concluded last month that the construction would  inhibit breeding and, "over time, may ultimately lead to the eventual extinction of the  species."  The Sonoran pronghorns are not alone: Rare species such as jaguars, ocelots and long- nose bats are also likely to face problems with the new barriers, scientists said.  Earlier this month, however, the Bush administration waived more than 30 environmental  and land-management laws to meet its deadline for building at least 360 miles of the  border fence. Two advocacy groups, the Sierra Club and Defenders of Wildlife, have 
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While popularly perceived as a barren desert, the landscape that straddles the  border includes some of the world's most diverse terrain, such as Arizona's Sky  Island area, which features isolated mountains surrounded by grassland or  desert. Dotted with evergreen trees at higher altitudes, the region attracts  jaguars as well as the Sonoran pronghorn and bighorn sheep that regularly  crisscross between the United States and Mexico.  Farther to the east, the Lower Rio Grande Valley is home to one of the last  free-flowing rivers in the United States, as well as more than 300 butterfly 
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2008 for the course BSCI 363 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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363 Lecture 37 - 2008 - Coal Does More Than Keep the Lights...

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