NR 510 Week 1 TD.docx - NR 510 Week 1 TD PART 1 Mary a baccalaureate prepared registered nurse has been practicing for fifteen years Throughout her

NR 510 Week 1 TD.docx - NR 510 Week 1 TD PART 1 Mary a...

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NR 510 Week 1 TD PART 1: Mary, a baccalaureate prepared registered nurse, has been practicing for fifteen years. Throughout her nursing career, she worked in pediatric, surgical, and emergency departments. She worked as a floor nurse, charge nurse, and was recently offered a position as a nursing supervisor. A stipulation for becoming a nursing supervisor is that Mary must attain a Master of Health Administration degree within 2 years of accepting the position. The offer prompted Mary to contemplate her career. She is interested in returning to college, but she realized that she does not want to pursue working in administration and away from patients. Mary decided to become an Advanced Practice Nurse (APN). Mary knows that working as an APN will allow her the opportunity to make a larger contribution to individuals, environment, health, and nursing. She researched graduate nursing programs and discovered that there are four roles of the APN. Mary must choose one role and apply to a program, but she is unsure about the different roles and their individual scopes of practice. Discussion question: How would you decide? Develop a pros and cons list to assist Mary in making her decision. Include each role of the APN on the list and be certain to provide appropriate rationales and citations. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), also referred to as advanced practice nurses (APNs), are registered nurses who, via a master’s level education, are able to provide complete care to patients through 4 different avenues. The 4 roles an APRN can chose from are certified nurse practitioner (CNP), certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA), clinical nurse specialist (CNS), and certified nurse midwife (CNM). A CNP is able to manage and care for patients at an advanced level, similar to how a doctor cares for patients. CPNs are obligated to care for patients by promoting health, preventing disease, diagnosing and managing diseases that are acute and chronic in nature, educating patients on disease prevention and management, and counseling patients as needed (NCSBN, 2017). CPNs can provider care in many different settings, some of which include primary care or family practice, acute care settings such as in the ICU or ER, geriatrics, pediatrics, OB/GYN, and internal medicine (NCSBN, 2017). CPNs can choose from 3 different education programs, family nurse practitioner, adult or gerontological nurse practitioner, or acute care nurse
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practitioner (NCSBN, 2017). Whichever education path one chooses, care can be provided in diverse settings, although it would take some extra learning for gerontological and acute care NPs to work in pediatrics. Pros for CNP include the ability to provide complete care to the whole patient and the plethora of job opportunities available. Cons for CNP are that the scope of practice varies by state and many states have reduced and restricted roles in place, meaning the NP cannot practice without physician oversight. As of 2016, there were 21 states that allow CNPs to practice independently
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