HOMEWORK 2- Machiavellian Leadership and Napoleon Bonaparte

HOMEWORK 2- Machiavellian Leadership and Napoleon Bonaparte...

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Machiavellian Leadership and Napoleon Bonaparte The Prince is the political masterpiece of Machiavelli, a realist political philosopher of the Italian Renaissance, and is considered to be amongst the most powerful and inspiring political compositions to this day. Napoleon, a conquering leader and legend of France towards the end of the enlightenment, is remembered as a hated and respected leader who influenced and motivated many rulers subsequent to his time. Napoleon had many goals as a ruler; ultimately, however, his goal was to acquire an empire and obtain power for his own self. In his quest for power, he repeatedly betrayed his people and overpowered their expressions of pain. Machiavelli’s acknowledges and pronounces the fact that a leader must not always act morally. In fact, Machiavelli says, “In order not to have to rob his subjects, to be able to defend himself, not to become poor and contemptible, and not to be forced to become rapacious, a prince must consider it of little importance if he incurs the reputation of being a miser, for this is
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2008 for the course PHIL 335 taught by Professor Lloyd during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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HOMEWORK 2- Machiavellian Leadership and Napoleon Bonaparte...

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