HOMEWORK 5-Rousseauian Democratic Leadership and the French Revolutionary Leadership of Robespierre

HOMEWORK 5-Rousseauian Democratic Leadership and the French Revolutionary Leadership of Robespierre

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Rousseauian Democratic Leadership and the French Revolutionary Leadership of Robespierre and Danton "This is no trial; Louis is not a prisoner at the bar; you are not judges; you are— you cannot but be—statesmen, and the representatives of the nation. You have not to pass sentence for or against a single man, but you have to take a resolution on a question of the public safety, and to decide a question of national foresight. It is with regret that I pronounce, the fatal truth: Louis ought to perish rather than a hundred thousand virtuous citizens; Louis must die, so that the country may live." These famous words of Robespierre demonstrate his beliefs in Rousseau’s model of leadership. In 1792, he said these words with regards to the trial of King Louis XVI’s execution. The basis of his argument was that King Louis XVI attempted to escape the country, which would have empowered enemies, and the King’s willingness to put himself before the entire country was reason enough for him to lose his life. In this time of chaos for the country, rumor had it that Robespierre had intentions
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2008 for the course PHIL 335 taught by Professor Lloyd during the Spring '07 term at USC.

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