Isopod_Teacher.doc - Cornell Science Inquiry Partnerships...

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Cornell Science Inquiry PartnershipsCornell UniversityThe Wonderful World of IsopodsTeacher’s Guideby Shannon B. Olsson, CSIP Graduate Teaching Fellow, Cornell UniversityObjective:Students will utilize inquiry skills to observe isopod behavior and develop andtest hypotheses concerning that behavior.Subject:Biology/Life ScienceAudience:AP or High School (Version One) and Middle School (5th-8thgrade) (VersionTwo)Time Required:1 Full PeriodBackgroundThis activity allows students to design and carry out an experiment related to animalbehavior. Originally a rather “cookbook” AP Biology lab (AP Biology Laboratory Manual,Edition D), it has been modified to incorporate more student driven discovery and learning.Versions have been created for both high school (and AP) and middle school classrooms.Pillbugs (also known as sowbugs or roly-polys) and woodlice are types of crustaceansknown as isopods. Related to shrimp and crabs, these crustaceans live on land, mostly inleaf litter and soil, and use gills for respiration. They feed on decaying material as well asalgae, moss, and bark. Isopods have two eyes, two pairs of antennae, and seven pairs oflegs.In this activity, students will observe isopods and generate questions about the behaviorsthey observe. They will then create hypotheses based on these questions and developmethods to test them. Following their experiments, the students must interpret their resultsand generate conclusions from their experiments.Learning Objectives1)Students will observe animal behavior and generate questions based on theirobservations.2)Students will generate relevant hypotheses from their observations.3)Students will create appropriate testing procedures including variables and controlsto test their hypotheses.4)Students with perform experiments to test their animal behavior hypotheses.
Cornell Science Inquiry PartnershipsCornell University5)Students will analyze the results of their experiments and generate appropriateconclusions about the behaviors they observed.NYS Science Education Standards Addressed1)Standard 1: (High School and Middle School):Key Idea 1:The central purposeof scientific inquiry is to develop explanations of natural phenomena in acontinuing, creative process.Key Idea 2:Beyond the use of reasoning andconsensus, scientific inquiry involves the testing of proposed explanationsinvolving the use of conventional techniques and procedures and usually requiringconsiderable ingenuity.Key Idea 3:The observations made while testing proposedexplanations, when analyzed using conventionaland invented methods, providenew insights into phenomena.

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Term
Spring
Professor
GregoryBall
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