lecture_1_intro_1_final

lecture_1_intro_1_final - Introduction 1 "What is real? How...

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Introduction
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1 What is real? “What is real? How do you define real? If you’re talking about what you can feel, what you can smell, what you can taste and see, then real is simply electrical signals interpreted by your brain. This is the world that you know.” —Morpheus’ answer to Neo in The Matrix, 1999
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1 Early Philosophy of Perception • Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave” (380 BCE)
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1 Early Philosophy of Perception (cont’d) • Perception and your sense of reality are the products of evolution: Survival of the fittest on – Importance of type of energy in the environment determines which senses have developed in a given species
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1 Some Animals are Able to Sense Stimuli that Humans Cannot
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1 Early Philosophy of Perception (cont’d) • Some species sense energies that humans cannot: – Bees see ultraviolet lights – Rattlesnakes sense infrared energy – Dogs and cats can sense sounds with higher frequencies – Birds, turtles, and amphibians use magnetic fields to navigate – Elephants can hear very low-frequency sounds, which are used to communicate
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1 Early Philosophy of Perception (cont’d) • Heraclitus (540–480 BCE): “You can never step into the same river twice.” – Everything is always changing – Idea that perceiver cannot perceive the same event in exactly the same manner each time Adaptation: A reduction in response caused by prior or continuing stimulation • Can you give examples?
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1 Early Philosophy of Perception (cont’d) • Democritus (460–370 BCE): The world is made up of atoms that collide with one another, and the sensations caused by these make contact with our sense organs – Perception is the result of the physical interaction between the world and our bodies Æ olfaction, touch – Idea of primary qualities and secondary qualities
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1 Early Philosophy of Perception (cont’d) Sensory transducer: A receptor that converts physical energy from the environment to neural activity • Sensation Æ Perception
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course EXP 3202 taught by Professor Gerstein during the Fall '07 term at FSU.

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lecture_1_intro_1_final - Introduction 1 "What is real? How...

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