107w17drug2 (1).pptx - Drug 2 C107 Flash writing Grass...

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C107 02-07-17 Drug 2
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Flash writing Grass
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AMERICA IN GLOBAL CONTEXT International gr oup
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toughest countries
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lenient countries
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2014/drugs/prison/us
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CAMPAIGNS AGAINST MARIJUANA Bakalar, Marihuana Reconsidered (1977) “…the lack of scientific understanding concerning the effects of the drug enabled the alarmist propaganda of the federal Bureau of Narcotics to go substantially unchallenged.” (16)
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KILLER DRUG “Scientists and officials with their lack of information did little to diminish the burgeoning fear that marihuana was a ‘killer drug,’ that it led not only to crime, but to insanity and moral deterioration as well.” (17)
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ALARMIST RHETORIC Youngsters known to be ‘muggle- heads” fortified themselves with the narcotics and proceeded to shoot down police, bank clerks and casual by- standers.” (17, New Orleans)
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SOME OVERVIEW 1. American approach – prohibition, rather than regulation or medicalization 2. 1900 – Duster depiction of users and regulation 3. 1914 Harrison Act 4. Cocaine – from medical marvel to menace
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5. Anslinger and moral entrepreneurs (Becker) and bureaucratic expansion argument (Dickson) 6. Marijuana Tax Act of 1937 7. Throughout – social threat/race/class effects 8. Marijuana – from “killer weed” to “drop-out drug”
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9. Reassessment of drug policies (1960s and 1970s – marijuana specific) 10. Criminalization of crack 11. 1980s-present increase in incarceration 12. depenalization
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AMERICAN APPROACH 1.American approach – prohibition, rather than regulation or medicalization Vs. Dutch Vs. British – medical model for heroin Vs. harm reduction approaches Vs. other Western nations
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DIFFERENT APPROACH 100 YEARS AGO 2. 1900 – Duster depiction of users and regulation
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“THERE WAS ONCE A TIME WHEN ANYONE COULD GO TO his corner druggist and buy grams of morphine or heroin for just a few pennies. There was no need to have a prescription from a physician. The middle and upper classes purchased more than the lower and working classes, and there was no moral stigma attached to such narcotics use. The year was 1900, and the country was the United States.”
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HARRISON ACT 3. 1914 Harrison Act The critical transformation from
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