SOC295 S2 2017 Week 4 work and productivity.pptx

SOC295 S2 2017 Week 4 work and productivity.pptx - work and...

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SOC295 | week 4 | 2017 work and employment
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Housekeeping Make sure you attend tutorials in preparation for first writing task (due 1/9/2017). Quiz from week 2: The IT glitch that affected question on Durkheim and solidarity has been fixed by given everyone full points (that is 0.5 out of 2).
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Recap: The course so far Week 1: thinking sociologically social interaction interpretive understanding relationship between individual and society Sociological timeline Week 2: social division of labour structural differentiation social integration systemic integration work/labour/employment Week 3: capitalism industrial society post-industrial society Modes of production
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Sociological concepts Pre-modern WS Modern WS Late-modern WS Differentiation Familial division of labour Social division of labour Hyper- differentiation Integration Mechanical solidarity; Shared values (collective conscience) Organic solidarity; functional/systemic interdependencies Blend of systemic & social integration (How hard / easy is it to negotiate norms and values?) Mode of production Agricultural (land-based; immediate use) Industrial (Manufacturing; for profit) Post-industrial (services; for profit) Rationalisation SOC295 so far
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Week 4 – work and productivity or the rationality/the logic of capitalist work societies Key question: How can we get more out of work (and maybe life)? The short answer is: we rationalise everything, not just work, but the whole of society which results in rational (work) societies. 1. rationalisation as a concept (Max Weber) 2. The consequences of rationalisation (systems & lifeworlds) 3. Types of action / rationalisation and integration 4. Examples
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Max Weber’s diagnosis of modern (work) societies One of the most influential thinkers when it comes to the analysis of the economy, society, work, employment and capitalism. Western civilisation differs from all others in its ‘specific and peculiar rationalism ’ (Brubaker 1984: 8). Weber’s (sociological) goal is to understand the ‘characteristic uniqueness of the reality in which we move’. … And the most salient characteristic of modern industrial capitalism , according to Weber, is its thoroughgoing rational calculability (Brubaker 1984: 9) which results in what can be describes as a ‘rationalised society’. 1858 – 1917
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Weber’s idea of ‘rationality’ Formal versus substantive rationality “Weber distinguished two types of rationality, ‘ substantive rationality ’, based on the belief in ultimate values, ideals, goals, ends which are pursued for their own sake: equality, justice, freedom; and ‘ formal rationality ’ based on the calculation of means over ends, the search for the most efficient and cost effective measures to achieve narrowly defined goals. Formal rationality is not concerned with values oriented to achieving a better society only with those values which make existing structures work effectively: Hence, formal rationality constitutes the basis of modern market capitalism” (Swingewood 2000: 104).
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