Chapter 10 Study Guide.docx - Chapter 10 Study Guide...

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Chapter 10 Study Guide Motivation Whose theory of motivation is considered to be a humanistic theory? Explain what is meant by humanism. Describe Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, including the difference between deficiency needs- Basic requirements for physical and psychological well-being as identified by Maslow. and growth needs- Needs for knowing, appreciating, and understanding, which people try to satisfy after their basic needs are met Provide examples of what may happen when needs are not met. What is locus of control- location Define intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Give examples of internal and external motivators. What classroom strategies increase intrinsic motivation? What classroom strategies tend to decrease overall motivation? Explain attribution theory, including what is meant by internal/external and stable/unstable. List the four attributions in this theory. What attributions typically increase motivation? Define anxiety in the classroom, including symptoms of anxiety in students. Identify strategies that increase student engagement and give classroom examples. 1. Definitions in Motivation – use these terms to fill in the blanks of the definitions below: rewards reinforcement value (used 2x) incentives self-actualization self-esteem self-efficacy stable unstable internal external motivation to continue motivation to engage ability effort intrinsic praise extrinsic luck task difficulty locus of control expectancy valence expectancy-valence attribution deficiency motivation behavioral humanistic Maslow Motivation is defined as the influence of needs and desires on the intensity and direction of behavior, or as an internal process that activates, guides, and maintains behavior over time.
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