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Original Sin Shawna Hazlett Theology Survey 202 B17
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“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. . .” The beginning of Genesis recounts for us creation, the mind and heart of God set in to motion. He created light, water, land, vegetation, living creatures, and man. He called all of these things good, and so they were. In the image and the likeness of Himself He created man, intended to be without flaw or imperfection. Intended to obey Him and to serve Him by caring for His creation. Man was to be an unblemished reflection of his God, but Genesis 3 changed things; sin enters the story. This is the origin of sin. Philosophical Foundations In order to even recognize sin as reality, one must have belief in God. One must presuppose that there is a greater power than us, and that that power has set forth laws regarding how we are to act. To this, Akin (2014) says that “A biblical definition of sin can only be understood in relationship with God. Although having moral and social implications, sin is basically an affront against the person of God.” There are a few foundations and presuppositions needed in regards to original sin, as well. One of these presuppositions would be that sin is, indeed, a reality. One would believe that there is a higher power who has created a law for us to obey, and would believe that something or someone has broken the ability we once had to obey that law to the letter. Secondly, one would believe that all humans are “depraved,” or that they are corrupt, and that this corruption began somewhere. Biblical Evaluation Sin originates in the Fall, accounted for in Genesis 3. Here, Eve has an encounter with a serpent, either an agent of Satan, or Satan himself, regarding the infamous tree. Eve explains to
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the serpent that she and Adam may not eat the fruit of the tree in the midst of the garden, to which the serpent responds with quite a crafty retort. He knows that immediate physical death will not result from eating of the tree, and so he tells Eve that she will not die. However, he does
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