Julius Ceasar Essay Final Copy.docx - Arredondo 1 Ethan...

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Arredondo 1 Ethan Arredondo Mrs. Stevenson Pre-AP English II Period 4 6 May 2016 The Persuading of Julius Caesar : The arguments of Calphurnia and Decius Speakers use rhetoric in their oratory to persuade their audiences to believe in what they’re saying. In Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar , Calphurnia, Caesar’s wife, has dreamt that Caesar will be killed. Calphurnia then tries to persuade Caesar to stay at home with her, while one of Caesar’s conspirators, Decius, tries to persuade Caesar to go to the senate, where he will be killed. Calphurnia and Decius both use logical appeal in their arguments in order to persuade Caesar into doing what they wish him to do and try their best to adapt their arguments to Caesar’s personality. Calphurnia uses the logic of her dream and her relationship with Caesar, while Decius uses the logic of cause and effect and his knowledge of Caesar’s desires to appeal to Caesar’s thinking and to show his/her understanding of Caesar in his/her argument. Caesar finds Decius’s argument more persuasive than Calphurnia’s because of the cause and effect logic that Decius uses and because of the superior way in which Decius fits his argument to who Caesar is. These things together are found more appealing to Caesar’s mind and for that reason Caesar decides to go to the senate, where he will be murdered. Both Calphurnia and Decius use rhetorical appeals in their arguments to try to persuade Caesar to their side, but only one of them wins Caesar over. Calphurnia uses logical appeal, logos, by using her dream and her relationship with Caesar to convince him to stay home. Calphurnia tells Caesar that she dreamt “horrid sights” (4) of “Fierce fiery warriors” (6) fighting and of “blood upon the capital” (9). This is persuasive because the dark descriptions of Calphurnia’s dream create fear in Caesar and show Caesar
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Arredondo 2 that if he goes to the senate, war and blood will result. Calphurnia then begs Caesar to “not go forth” (30) because her dream is “beyond all use” (31) and because she fears of his death. Calphurnia is trying to explain to Caesar that this omen is not a normal experience and that he should stay home because if he doesn’t, he might be killed. Calphurnia’s plea to keep Caesar from going to the senate attacks Caesar’s
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