Impact Assignment 1.docx

Impact Assignment 1.docx - Running head ATTACHMENT STYLE...

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Running head: ATTACHMENT STYLE AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT 1 Attachment Style: Impact on Child Development Tamara Combs Liberty University
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The Impact of Attachment style on Child Development 2 Attachment Style: Impact on Child Development The birth of a child begins an on-going course of shared adjustment amongst the child and his or her caregivers and the community as a whole. Interactions shaped throughout the initial phases of life function as an example for many relationships in the future and may have long-lasting consequences. Infants do not have the verbal capability to articulate to their caregivers what they need, so they frequently convey needs through their behavior. Consequently, regular observation to all characteristics of a child is a very challenging responsibility. Parents want their children to grow up healthy and to acquire behaviors that permit them to take control of their own. Parents wish to understand how to give the best upbringing achievable, particularly when they do not want to repeat their family accounts (Jones et al., 2014). Attachment is a simple human requirement for a close and intimate relationship among infants and their caregivers. For example, John Bowlby and Erik Erikson have suggested that the relationship that a newborn child has at least one guardian amid the first year of life give him a functioning depiction of himself as well as other people (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). Of Erikson’s eight stages of psychosocial development, he believed Trust vs. Mistrust was the most important. According to John Bowlby, the infant’s first attachment relationship is with his primary caregiver. Bowlby’s theory of how the connection with primary caregivers change and what it indicates for the child’s psychosocial life is called attachment theory (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).
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The Impact of Attachment style on Child Development 3 Attachment theory is derived with the idea that an infant’s early relationship with their caregiver is critical for social and emotional growth. Development of Attachment Attachment develops in four phases (Levy et al., 2011). During the first phase (Pre- attachment) universally it seems babies are in tune with environmental cues signaling to people for attention. Babies are born equipped with behaviors like crying, cooing, babbling and smiling to ensure adult attention & adults are biologically programmed to respond to infant signals (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). During the second phase(Attachment in the making), probably first by smell then by sight, the baby develops preference for one or more caregivers, the phase of familiarizing and motioning to one or several specific people. Infants respond differently to familiar caregiver than to strangers (Levy, 2011). The baby would babble and smile more to the mother and quiets more quickly when the mother picks him up. The infant learns that her actions affect the behavior of those around. They begin to develop “Sense of Trust” where they expect that the caregiver will respond when signaled. The infant still does not protest when separated
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