Business (7).docx - Step 1 Consider your audience An...

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Step 1 Consider your audience. An executive summary is designed for readers who are unfamiliar with the technical details of your subject, and who might not be able to understand the paper itself. Summarize the paper's contents and implications in a way you know will be understood by your audience. Step 2 Include the main thrust of the paper -- its subject, the methods of research you used, the results you found and the nontechnical implications of those results. Remember that since you are writing a summary you don't have to go in depth into every aspect of the research because that's what the paper itself is for. Simply describe the types of sources or experiments you used and what you learned from them. Step 3 Include a section explaining the goals of the paper and how they were accomplished. If you're writing a scientific paper, remember that demonstrating a hypothesis to be false isn't a failure. As long as you've gotten a useful result, the paper has accomplished its goal: to test the hypothesis. Step 4 Give the summary to a nontechnical person to read: a friend in a substantially different field or a parent. Ask if they're able to understand the basic thrust of the paper. If they can correctly explain the main points of your paper to you, your summary has done its job. Executive Summary Get to the point! Whether in school or in the workplace, your teachers or colleagues don't have time to waste. The executive summary should be a very brief synopsis of your business, its goals and how you will reach them. It should be no more than one page in length and should focus on defining your business or product and provide some concrete details on recent performance and future plans. Keep in mind that this may be the only piece of your proposal that many people will read, so make it count! Qualitative Analysis A significant portion of any business proposal is the narrative, or qualitative, portion of the plan. This will include your company's mission, a description of the products or services offered, biographies of the officers and an analysis of your market and opportunities. When developing such a plan for a collegiate course, it's vital to align the subtopics of your proposal with the concepts you've covered in class. For instance, if you're taking a marketing course, you will want to fully articulate what you believe to be the company's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the competitive marketplace. Quantitative Analysis Having a handle on your past or projected financials is essential to a college business proposal. Since most college proposals are theoretical, much of this information will likely be fabricated. Most business plans contain a balance sheet that outlines the company's assets and liabilities, as well as expected cash flow for the following fiscal year and beyond.
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