cultural values plagiarism and fairness when plagiarism gets in the way of learning_N Hayes_2005.pdf

Cultural values plagiarism and fairness when plagiarism gets in the way of learning_N Hayes_2005.pdf

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See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: Cultural Values, Plagiarism, and Fairness: When Plagiarism Gets in the Way of Learning Article in Ethics & Behavior · July 2005 DOI: 10.1207/s15327019eb1503_2 · Source: OAI CITATIONS 127 READS 572 2 authors: Some of the authors of this publication are also working on these related projects: REDD+ in Brazil View project Niall Hayes Lancaster University 35 PUBLICATIONS 614 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE Lucas D. Introna Lancaster University 122 PUBLICATIONS 1,917 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE All content following this page was uploaded by Lucas D. Introna on 28 August 2017. The user has requested enhancement of the downloaded file.
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Cultural Values, Plagiarism, and Fairness: When Plagiarism Gets in the Way of Learning Niall Hayes and Lucas D. Introna Department of Organisation, Work, & Technology Lancaster University Management School, United Kingdom The dramatic increase in the number of overseas students studying in the United Kingdom and other Western countries has required academics to reevaluate many as- pects of their own, and their institutions’, practices. This article considers differing cultural values among overseas students toward plagiarism and the implications this may have for postgraduate education in a Western context. Based on focus-group in- terviews, questionnaires, and informal discussions, we report the views of plagiarism among students in 2 postgraduate management programs, both of which had a high constituency of overseas students. We show that plagiarist practices are often the out- come of many complex and culturally situated influences. We suggest that educators need to appreciate these differing cultural assumptions if they are to act in an ethical manner when responding to issues of plagiarism among international students. Keywords: plagiarism, alienation, fairness, learning, patchwriting The issue of academic integrity within higher education has received considerable attention in the literature over recent years (Carroll & Appleton, 2001; Deckert, 1993; Dryden, 1999; Harris, 2001; Howard, 1993, 1995; Kolich, 1983; Lathrop, 2000; Martin, 1994; Myers, 1998; Pennycook, 1996; Scollon, 1995; Sherman, 1992). Academic integrity refers to honesty and transparency in the ways in which knowledge is acquired and transmitted (The Center for Academic Integrity, Duke University, 2004). Honesty is premised on high levels of trust between staff and students and on ensuring that all students are treated fairly. Further, academic in- ETHICS & BEHAVIOR, 15 (3), 213–231 Copyright © 2005, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Correspondence should be addressed to Lucas D. Introna, Department of Organisation, Work, & Technology, Lancaster University Management School, Lancaster LA1 4XY, United Kingdom. E-mail: [email protected]
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tegrity requires that all writers acknowledge the work of others and that action be taken if there is any wrongdoing (Drinan, 1999). Examples of compromising aca- demic integrity include copying from others during exams, taking crib sheets into
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