youth gangs.docx - HISTORY Gang Growth in the West o The...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
HISTORY Gang Growth in the West o The united states had a Mexican population as early as the 1500’s o Spanish and Mexican settlers became US citizens at end of Spanish- American War in 1848 o Large-scale Mexican immigration began in the early 1900s o Downtown plazas of cities like Los Angeles and Albuquerque were original settlement areas, from which the cities developed Gang-like groups were said to have first appeared in the Western region as early as the 1890s The precursors of Latino or Chicano urban gangs in the Western region were the palomilla (“flock of doves”) o Small groups of Mexican men that formed out of a “male cohorting tradition” o First appeared in south Texas in early 1900s o Migrated along the trail that originated in Mexico and continued along a route through El Paso and Albuquerque, onward to Los Angeles Many Mexican street gang members feel that the US stole part of their country from their ancestors o In 1848, the Treaty of Hidalgo involved the granting of a large southwestern region of the US (including California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and half of Colorado) to us from the government of Mexico Mexican citizens in the area became American citizens as part of this process o These citizens became alienated even further Were not wanted in the US, but could not return to Mexico because they had become American citizens Joined by other Mexican immigrants due to Mexican Revolution (1910-1920) and the labor needs of the Southwest and Midwest Approximately 2 million Mexican immigrants came to the US during the early 1900s Two forces incubated street gangs of Mexican origin in Los Angeles and in other Western cities: o Physical and social “marginalization” The barrios in which the earliest and most firmly established gangs developed were well-demarcated settlements of Mexican immigrants “they were located in geographically isolated areas that other settlers and developers had bypassed as less appropriate for habitation, and were further isolated by cultural, racial, and socioeconomic barriers enforced by
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ingrained prejudices of the Anglo-American community” Mexican immigrants were culturally marginalized between their society of origin and the dominant American culture to which they had migrated Cholo youth, the poorest of the poor marginalized immigrants, could not fully assimilate into Anglo culture or develop a unique identity incorporating aspects of both Anglo and Latino culture o This group comprises the cholo subculture. Being a cholo allows such youth to assert a Latino identity, take pride in it, and deny being Anglicized o Cholo come from Spanish solo (meaning alone) Gangs more territorially structured than the palomilla and cholo groups were populated by second-generation children of Mexican Americans who gathered in groups to “give themselves emotional and psychological support in a defeating world”
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern