fl16(X)-finalX.pdf - CS/ECE Algorithms and Models of...

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CS/ECE : Algorithms and Models of Computation, Fall Final Exam (Version X) — December , Name: NetID: Section: A B C D E F G H I J K don’t Spencer Yipu Charlie Chao Alex Tana Mark Konstantinos know Mark Konstantinos # Total Score Max Grader Don’t panic! Please print your name and your NetID and circle your discussion section in the boxes above. This is a closed-book, closed-notes, closed-electronics exam. If you brought anything except your writing implements and your two double-sided ½ " " cheat sheets, please put it away for the duration of the exam. In particular, you may not use any electronic devices. Please read the entire exam before writing anything. Please ask for clarification if any question is unclear. The exam lasts minutes. If you run out of space for an answer, continue on the back of the page, or on the blank pages at the end of this booklet, but please tell us where to look. Alternatively, feel free to tear out the blank pages and use them as scratch paper. As usual, answering any (sub)problem with “I don’t know” (and nothing else) is worth % partial credit. Yes, even for problem . Correct, complete, but suboptimal solutions are always worth more than %. A blank answer is not the same as “I don’t know”. Beware the Three Deadly Sins. Give complete solutions, not examples. Don’t use weak induction. Declare all your variables. If you use a greedy algorithm, you must prove that it is correct to receive any credit. Otherwise, proofs are required only when we explicitly ask for them. Please return your cheat sheets and all scratch paper with your answer booklet. Good luck! And have a great winter break!
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CS/ECE Final Exam (Version X) Fall . For each of the following questions, indicate every correct answer by marking the “Yes” box, and indicate every incorrect answer by marking the “No” box. Assume P 6 = NP. If there is any other ambiguity or uncertainty, mark the “No” box. For example: X Yes No 2 + 2 = 4 Yes X No x + y = 5 Yes X No S can be solved in polynomial time. X Yes No Je ff is not the Queen of England. There are 40 yes/no choices altogether. Each correct choice is worth + ½ point. Each incorrect choice is worth - ¼ point. To indicate “I don’t know”, write IDK next to the boxes; each IDK is worth + point. (a) Which of the following statements is true for every language L { 0 , 1 } ? Yes No L contains the empty string " . Yes No L is infinite. Yes No L is regular. Yes No L is infinite or L is decidable (or both). Yes No If L is the union of two regular languages, then L is regular.
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