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Running head: THE ADVENTURE OF CHICAGO 1 The Adventure of Chicago Cassy Landes Muskegon Community College History 101 George Maniates April 7, 2017 Cassy Landes
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Running head: THE ADVENTURE OF CHICAGO 2 George Maniates History 101 April 7, 2017 The Adventure of Chicago Chicago, Illinois was named a city in 1837 by Illinois legislature after it reached the minimum population needed to become a city of 4,000 occupants (Lambert). Today, it is irrefutably the third most populous city that, as many people can attest to, is filled with a unique history, food, and culture. Consequently, students who travel to the infamous “Windy City” are enriched wherever they dare to venture. A few classes at Muskegon Community College created a trip in February to travel to Chicago to experience the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, the Field Museum, and the many experiences a large city such as Chicago has to offer, all in order to gain a cultural and historical enrichment for each student. At the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, a person is able to take a trip back in time to the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Khorsabad, Assyria, Syro-Anatolia, Megiddo, Egypt, Persia, and Nubia. Focusing more on Mesopotamia, this museum uses the many uncovered artifacts, corresponding captions, and descriptive explanations to, as accurately as possible, depict the life of these ancient Mesopotamians. One such crucial way of life is the practice of hunting and fishing. Due to one of the most basic human survival needs, the need to find food, it is not a surprise that the ancient Mesopotamians began to hunt the surrounding
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Running head: THE ADVENTURE OF CHICAGO 3 wildlife, which included leopards, wild cattle, boars, deer, gazelles, ostriches, vultures, and eagles. However, one of the most interesting thing about this civilization is the high religious and symbolic aspects they brought to everything, and hunting was no different. Many wild animals were revered as products of the death of gods, and therefore, can be seen on many monuments and plaques now in museums such as the Oriental Institute. The plaques on display at this museum included one of an animal that was hunted down for sport: the lion. The depiction of the lion enforced the idea of it being a feared and strong beast, pushing the king’s role as the “father” who subsequently needs to “protect” his citizens, thus, creating an entire royal sport around the killing of the lion. Not only were land animals the source of food, but because Mesopotamia is aptly placed between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, carp and perch were among the most commonly harvested food. Added archaeological evidence of nets, hooks, and spears further prove the theory of the alternate food source. With the help of economic texts outlining how religious ceremonies are performed after the killing of the lion, and that fish were important offerings in temples, people are able to see the large impact religion has on practically every aspect of the Mesopotamian lifestyle.
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