Course Syllabus - Instructor Information Warren Dukes Ph.D...

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Instructor Information Course Designation Warren Dukes, Ph.D. SOC 310 –007 Department of Sociology Racial and Ethnic Diversity Office: STONE 333-B Fall 2017 Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursday – 11am to 1pm, and by appointment Phone: (765) 494-9820 [email protected] Class Designation This class convenes each Monday, Wednesday, & Friday from 11AM to 11:50AM in STON Hall, RM 215. The required textbook(s) for this course is: Marger, M.N. (1997). Race and Ethnic Relations: American and Global Perspecctive, 10th ed. Cengage Learning. Suggested Readings: Friere, Paulo (1970), Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Continuum International Publishing Group Alexander, M. (2012). The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York: New Press Gallagher, C. A. (2012). Rethinking the Color Line (5 th ed.). McGraw Hill Anderson, E. (2010). The Imperative of Integration. Princeton, New Jersey: Prinston University Press. Haddad, Y. Y. (2011). Becoming American: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America. Waco: Baylor University Press. Naber, A. a. (2008). Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11: From Invisible Citizens to Visible Suspects. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press. Okihiro, G. Y. (1994). Margins and Mainstream: Asians in American History and Culture. Seattle: The University of Washington Press. Sundstrom, R. R. (2008). The Browning of America and the Evasion of Social Justice. Albany: State University of New York Press. COURSE DESCRIPTION This course examines racial and ethnic pluralism in America: ways groups have entered our society; their social and cultural characteristics; and their relationships with other groups. Groups include the English, Germans, Irish, Jews, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans. This course offers a new paradigm for exploring the sociological construct of race, with the aim of understanding the complex and systemic ways race and ethnicity have operated in American political, economic, criminal justice systems, and social cultures. COURSE OBJECTIVES The primary objectives of this course are, 1. To provide a safe forum for intellectual exchange on topics relevant to race and class. 2. To provide students with an appreciation for the Americanization experiences of the different racial and ethnic groups. 3. To invoke understanding on the social impacts of racial and ethnic group classification. 4. To examine the historical divisions of race through political and social institutions. 5. To advance students’ critical thinking skills by participation in critical evaluation exercises. Fall 2017 1
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INSTRUCTIONAL METHODOLOGY The teaching pedagogical style for this course is applicable to the Socratic Method teaching philosophy whereas students are the focal point of the class, not the instructor. Hence, this class is not primarily lecture focus. The instructor will facilitate discussions as needed to drive student’s engagement in critical thinking dialogue. Pedagogically, an effort will be made to ‘problematize’ issues of race, class, and ethnic diversity.
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