Packingham vs North Carolina.pdf - Personal Views of...

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Unformatted text preview: Personal​ ​Views​ ​of​ ​Packingham​ ​v.​ ​North​ ​Carolina Packingham​ ​v.​ ​North​ ​Carolina​ ​is​ ​a​ ​2017​ ​United​ ​States​ ​Supreme​ ​Court​ ​case​ ​in​ ​which​ ​the court​ ​agreed​ ​to​ ​hear​ ​Supreme​ ​Court​ ​of​ ​North​ ​Carolina​ ​law​ ​banning​ ​the​ ​use​ ​of​ ​various​ ​websites​ ​to registered​ ​sex​ ​offenders.​ ​Lester​ ​Packingham​ ​was​ ​indicted​ ​in​ ​2002​ ​by​ ​a​ ​North​ ​Carolina​ ​grand​ ​jury on​ ​two​ ​counts​ ​of​ ​statutory​ ​rape.​ ​Under​ ​the​ ​terms​ ​of​ ​a​ ​plea​ ​bargain,​ ​Packingham​ ​pled​ ​guilty​ ​to​ ​a single​ ​count​ ​of​ ​taking​ ​indecent​ ​liberties​ ​with​ ​a​ ​minor.​ ​As​ ​a​ ​result​ ​of​ ​the​ ​conviction,​ ​Packingham was​ ​ordered​ ​to​ ​register​ ​as​ ​a​ ​sex​ ​offender. In​ ​2008,​ ​the​ ​North​ ​Carolina​ ​General​ ​Assembly​ ​enacted​ ​a​ ​law​ ​which​ ​prohibits​ ​registered sex​ ​offenders​ ​from​ ​accessing​ ​any​ ​commercial​ ​social​ ​networking​ ​Web​ ​site​ ​where​ ​the​ ​sex​ ​offender knows​ ​that​ ​the​ ​site​ ​permits​ ​minor​ ​children​ ​to​ ​become​ ​members​ ​or​ ​to​ ​create​ ​or​ ​maintain​ ​personal Web​ ​pages​ ​on​ ​the​ ​commercial​ ​social​ ​networking​ ​Web​ ​site.​ ​Packingham​ ​was​ ​arrested​ ​in​ ​2010 after​ ​authorities​ ​came​ ​across​ ​a​ ​post​ ​on​ ​his​ ​Facebook​ ​profile,​ ​thanking​ ​God​ ​for​ ​having​ ​a​ ​parking ticket​ ​dismissed.​ ​He​ ​was​ ​arrested​ ​for​ ​violating​ ​North​ ​Carolina’s​ ​laws​ ​regarding​ ​convicted​ ​sex offenders,​ ​which​ ​barred​ ​the​ ​offender’s​ ​access​ ​to​ ​social​ ​media​ ​websites. After​ ​a​ ​grand​ ​jury​ ​indicted​ ​Packingham​ ​for​ ​violating​ ​the​ ​law,​ ​he​ ​argued​ ​that​ ​the​ ​law violated​ ​his​ ​First​ ​Amendment​ ​rights.​ ​He​ ​was​ ​convicted​ ​in​ ​trial​ ​court,​ ​which​ ​found​ ​that​ ​the​ ​state had​ ​an​ ​interest​ ​in​ ​keeping​ ​sexual​ ​predators​ ​off​ ​of​ ​social​ ​media​ ​websites​ ​for​ ​the​ ​protection​ ​of minors.​ ​The​ ​North​ ​Carolina​ ​Court​ ​of​ ​Appeals​ ​reversed​ ​and​ ​held​ ​that​ ​the​ ​social​ ​media​ ​website provision​ ​of​ ​the​ ​law​ ​was​ ​unconstitutional.​ ​The​ ​North​ ​Carolina​ ​Supreme​ ​Court​ ​reversed​ ​and​ ​held that​ ​the​ ​law​ ​was​ ​constitutional​ ​by​ ​finding​ ​that​ ​the​ ​law​ ​was​ ​a​ ​limitation​ ​on​ ​conduct​ ​and​ ​not​ ​a restriction​ ​of​ ​free​ ​speech. ...
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