ll.pdf - Setting a cottage farmyard in April/May Plot The...

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Unformatted text preview: Setting:​ ​a​ ​cottage​ ​farmyard​ ​in​ ​April/May Plot:​ ​The​ ​Nun’s​ ​Priest’s​ ​tale​ ​is​ ​about​ ​a​ ​rooster​ ​and​ ​his​ ​hens​ ​living​ ​on​ ​a​ ​poor​ ​widow’s farm.​ ​The​ ​rooster’s​ ​name​ ​is​ ​Chanticleer​ ​(shan-dick-lee-ear/Mr.​ ​C)​ ​and​ ​he​ ​is​ ​a​ ​talented rooster​ ​with​ ​a​ ​nice​ ​crowing​ ​ability.​ ​He​ ​has​ ​7​ ​hen​ ​wives​ ​but​ ​he​ ​loves​ ​Pertelote (per-ta-low-t/Lady​ ​P)​ ​the​ ​most.​ ​One​ ​night,​ ​Chanticleer​ ​awakes​ ​from​ ​a​ ​bad​ ​dream.​ ​In​ ​the dream​ ​he​ ​is​ ​attacked​ ​by​ ​a​ ​red,​ ​hound-like​ ​creature​ ​(fox).​ ​When​ ​he​ ​voices​ ​his​ ​concerns to​ ​Pertelote,​ ​she​ ​asks​ ​him​ ​to​ ​behave​ ​more​ ​manly.​ ​He​ ​disagrees​ ​and​ ​starts​ ​talking​ ​about a​ ​lot​ ​of​ ​other​ ​tragic​ ​tales​ ​based​ ​on​ ​their​ ​dreams.​ ​Pertelote​ ​convinces​ ​him​ ​to​ ​move​ ​on. The​ ​following​ ​month,​ ​Chanticleer​ ​is​ ​walking​ ​in​ ​the​ ​yard​ ​admiring​ ​a​ ​butterfly,​ ​when​ ​he spies​ ​a​ ​fox​ ​watching​ ​him.​ ​The​ ​fox​ ​speaks​ ​To​ ​chanticleer​ ​claiming​ ​to​ ​wish​ ​only​ ​to​ ​sit​ ​and listen​ ​to​ ​chanticleers​ ​wonderful​ ​voice.​ ​The​ ​Fox​ ​praises​ ​both​ ​Chanticleer​ ​and​ ​his​ ​father on​ ​their​ ​excellent​ ​singing​ ​abilities.​ ​Tricked​ ​by​ ​the​ ​flattery​ ​and​ ​bursting​ ​with​ ​pride, Chanticleer​ ​closes​ ​his​ ​eyes​ ​and​ ​begins​ ​to​ ​sing.​ ​The​ ​Fox​ ​dashes​ ​forward,​ ​grabs chanticleer​ ​in​ ​his​ ​mouth,​ ​and​ ​runs​ ​to​ ​the​ ​forest.​ ​Once​ ​Pertelote​ ​finds​ ​out​ ​what​ ​has happened,​ ​she​ ​burns​ ​her​ ​feathers​ ​with​ ​grief,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​great​ ​wail​ ​arises​ ​from​ ​the​ ​henhouse. The​ ​widow​ ​and​ ​her​ ​daughters​ ​hear​ ​the​ ​screeching​ ​and​ ​see​ ​the​ ​fox​ ​running​ ​away​ ​with the​ ​rooster.​ ​Everyone​ ​starts​ ​chasing​ ​the​ ​fox.​ ​Chanticleer​ ​very​ ​cleverly​ ​suggests​ ​that​ ​the fox​ ​turn​ ​out​ ​and​ ​brag​ ​about​ ​his​ ​clever​ ​scheme’s​ ​success.​ ​The​ ​fox​ ​opens​ ​his​ ​mouth​ ​and Chanticleer​ ​flies​ ​out​ ​of​ ​the​ ​fox’s​ ​mouth​ ​and​ ​into​ ​a​ ​high​ ​tree.​ ​The​ ​fox​ ​tries​ ​to​ ​flatter​ ​the bird​ ​into​ ​coming​ ​down,​ ​but​ ​Chanticleer​ ​has​ ​learned​ ​his​ ​lesson.​ ​He​ ​tells​ ​the​ ​fox​ ​that flattery​ ​will​ ​work​ ​for​ ​him​ ​no​ ​more.​ ​The​ ​moral​ ​of​ ​the​ ​story,​ ​concludes​ ​the​ ​Nun’s​ ​Priest,​ ​is never​ ​to​ ​trust​ ​a​ ​flatterer. tale​ ​also​ ​satirizes​ ​the​ ​Church.​ ​For​ ​example,​ ​the​ ​Nun’s​ ​Priest​ ​tells​ ​a​ ​story​ ​about​ ​a rooster​ ​that​ ​has​ ​seven​ ​wives,​ ​all​ ​of​ ​which​ ​are​ ​also​ ​his​ ​sisters.​ ​This​ ​satirizes​ ​the​ ​Church because​ ​a​ ​priest​ ​is​ ​telling​ ​a​ ​story​ ​in​ ​which​ ​a​ ​character​ ​has​ ​polygamous​ ​(pa-le-ga-miss) relationships;​ ​however,​ ​the​ ​Church​ ​only​ ​accepts​ ​monogamous​ ​(ma-na-ga-miss) relationships. The​ ​Priest​ ​believes​ ​that​ ​women​ ​are​ ​the​ ​source​ ​of​ ​sin!!! For​ ​example,​ ​when​ ​Chauntecleer​ ​has​ ​a​ ​nightmare​ ​about​ ​being​ ​attacked​ ​by​ ​a​ ​fox,​ ​he believes​ ​that​ ​this​ ​dream​ ​is​ ​foretelling​ ​a​ ​future​ ​event.​ ​However​ ​Chauntecleer’s​ ​wife, Pertelote,​ ​tells​ ​him​ ​that​ ​dreams​ ​are​ ​nothing​ ​but​ ​nonsense​ ​and​ ​are​ ​simply​ ​the​ ​result​ ​of overeating.​ ​Listening​ ​to​ ​his​ ​wife’s​ ​advice,​ ​Chauntecleer​ ​disregards​ ​his​ ​dream,​ ​but​ ​is later​ ​confronted​ ​by​ ​the​ ​fox​ ​that​ ​was​ ​present​ ​in​ ​his​ ​dream.​ ​Therefore,​ ​Chauntecleer​ ​is ultimately​ ​attacked​ ​by​ ​the​ ​fox​ ​because​ ​he​ ​listened​ ​to​ ​his​ ​wife’s​ ​advice​ ​and​ ​ignored​ ​the warning​ ​in​ ​his​ ​dream. note!!!!​​ ​that​ ​Pertelote’s​ ​name​ ​translates​ ​from​ ​French​ ​as​ ​“one​ ​who​ ​confuses​ ​someone’s fate.”​ ​As​ ​a​ ​result,​ ​Pertelote​ ​symbolizes/embodies​ ​confusion​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Priest​ ​believe woman​ ​are​ ​the​ ​source​ ​of​ ​sin​ ​because​ ​Eve​ ​committed​ ​the​ ​first​ ​sin​ ​when​ ​she​ ​ate​ ​the forbidden​ ​fruit. Irony: Comic​ ​Irony:​ ​Chanticleer​ ​and​ ​Pertelote​ ​discuss​ ​subjects​ ​of​ ​vast​ ​knowledge​ ​in​ ​a​ ​highle intellectual​ ​and​ ​moral​ ​in​ ​the​ ​contect​ ​of​ ​being​ ​barnyard​ ​chickens. Chickens​ ​are​ ​usually​ ​depicted​ ​to​ ​be​ ​cowardly​ ​creatures​ ​so​ ​the​ ​fact​ ​that​ ​Chanticleer​ ​is the​ ​leader​ ​of​ ​all​ ​the​ ​animlas​ ​in​ ​the​ ​farm​ ​is​ ​ironic. ...
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  • Winter '16
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