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Unformatted text preview: In​ ​Shakespeare's​ ​masterful​ ​play​ ​Hamlet,​​ ​the​ ​usage​ ​of​ ​punctuation​ ​is​ ​evident​ ​in​ ​Claudius’​ ​monologues and​ ​Hamlet’s​ ​soliloquy.​ ​In​ ​Claudius’​ ​monologue​ ​(1,2;​ ​1-38),​ ​Shakespeare​ ​places​ ​different punctuation​ ​marks​ ​to​ ​show​ ​Claudius’​ ​ ​“feelings”​ ​about​ ​his​ ​brother’s​ ​death​ ​and​ ​marrying​ ​his​ ​brother’s wife.​ ​It​ ​is​ ​clearly​ ​shown​ ​that​ ​Claudius​ ​seems​ ​to​ ​be​ ​lying​ ​about​ ​his​ ​sadness​ ​towards​ ​his​ ​brother’s death;​ ​“Though​ ​yet​ ​of​ ​Hamlet​ ​our​ ​dear​ ​brother’s​ ​death/The​ ​memory​ ​be​ ​green,​ ​and​ ​that​ ​it​ ​us befitted/To​ ​bear​ ​our​ ​hearts​ ​in​ ​grief​ ​and​ ​our​ ​whole​ ​kingdom/To​ ​be​ ​contracted​ ​in​ ​one​ ​brow​ ​of​ ​woe/Yet so​ ​far​ ​hath​ ​discretion​ ​fought​ ​with​ ​nature/That​ ​we​ ​with​ ​wisest​ ​sorrow​ ​think​ ​on​ ​him/Together​ ​with remembrance​ ​of​ ​ourselves”​ ​(1.2;​ ​1-7).​ ​When​ ​a​ ​person​ ​is​ ​lying,​ ​they​ ​tend​ ​to​ ​start​ ​rambling​ ​on​ ​in attempt​ ​to​ ​convince​ ​others​ ​that​ ​they​ ​are​ ​telling​ ​the​ ​truth.​ ​Shakespeare​ ​placed​ ​a​ ​period​ ​mark​ ​after several​ ​lines​ ​of​ ​Claudius​ ​speaking​ ​about​ ​his​ ​“sorrow”.​ ​In​ ​addition,​ ​in​ ​the​ ​No​ ​Fear​ ​Shakespeare sparknotes,​ ​it​ ​states​ ​that,​ ​“Although​ ​I​ ​still​ ​have​ ​fresh​ ​memories​ ​of​ ​my​ ​brother​ ​the​ ​elder​ ​Hamlet’s death,​ ​and​ ​though​ ​it​ ​was​ ​proper​ ​to​ ​mourn​ ​him​ ​throughout​ ​our​ ​kingdom,​ ​life​ ​still​ ​goes​ ​on—I​ ​think​ ​it’s wise​ ​to​ ​mourn​ ​him​ ​while​ ​also​ ​thinking​ ​about​ ​my​ ​own​ ​well​ ​being”​ ​(1.2;​ ​1-5).​ ​A​ ​dash​ ​is​ ​used​ ​to​ ​have extra​ ​emphasis​ ​on​ ​a​ ​certain​ ​phrase.​ ​Claudius​ ​talks​ ​about​ ​how​ ​it​ ​is​ ​necessary​ ​to​ ​mourn​ ​the​ ​death​ ​of his​ ​brother;​ ​however,​ ​he​ ​wants​ ​people​ ​to​ ​think​ ​more​ ​about​ ​his​ ​own​ ​self.​ ​ ​In​ ​Claudius’​ ​monologue​ ​(1.2 90-121),​ ​he​ ​states,​ ​“'Tis​ ​sweet​ ​and​ ​commendable​ ​in​ ​your​ ​nature,​ ​Hamlet,​ ​To​ ​give​ ​these​ ​mourning duties​ ​to​ ​your​ ​father.​ ​But​ ​you​ ​must​ ​know​ ​your​ ​father​ ​lost​ ​a​ ​father,​ ​That​ ​father​ ​lost,​ ​lost​ ​his,​ ​and​ ​the survivor​ ​bound​ ​In​ ​filial​ ​obligation​ ​for​ ​some​ ​term​ ​To​ ​do​ ​obsequious​ ​sorrow.​ ​But​ ​to​ ​persever​ ​In obstinate​ ​condolement​ ​is​ ​a​ ​course​ ​Of​ ​impious​ ​stubbornness”​ ​(1.2;​ ​90-98).​ ​The​ ​commas​ ​are​ ​placed​ ​in order​ ​to​ ​show​ ​an​ ​unnatural​ ​reaction​ ​that​ ​Claudius​ ​has​ ​to​ ​his​ ​brother’s​ ​death.​ ​Claudius​ ​tells​ ​Hamlet that​ ​he​ ​has​ ​to​ ​stop​ ​mourning​ ​his​ ​father​ ​because​ ​it​ ​is​ ​not​ ​manly.​ ​In​ ​Hamlet’s​ ​soliloquy​ ​(1.2;​ ​133-164), exclamation​ ​points​ ​focuses​ ​on​ ​the​ ​points​ ​at​ ​which​ ​emotion​ ​gets​ ​the​ ​better​ ​of​ ​Hamlet;​ ​before​ ​the exclamation​ ​points,​ ​Hamlet​ ​encounters​ ​a​ ​brief​ ​inner​ ​struggle​ ​set​ ​apart​ ​by​ ​hyphens.​ ​“"And​ ​yet,​ ​within a​ ​month,​ ​-Let​ ​me​ ​not​ ​think​ ​on't,​ ​-​ ​Frailty,​ ​thy​ ​name​ ​is​ ​woman!​ ​-A​ ​little​ ​month…Like​ ​Niobe,​ ​all​ ​tears; -​ ​why​ ​she,​ ​even​ ​she;​ ​-/​ ​O​ ​God!"​ ​(1.2;​ ​156-164). The​ ​punctuation​ ​that​ ​Shakespeare​ ​utilizes​ ​demonstrates​ ​the​ ​brief​ ​lapses​ ​into​ ​feeling​ ​that​ ​Hamlet encounters​ ​while​ ​attempting​ ​to​ ​reason.​ ​By​ ​using​ ​the​ ​particular​ ​punctuation,​ ​Shakespeare​ ​emphasizes the​ ​emotions​ ​Hamlet​ ​experiences​ ​as​ ​he​ ​explores​ ​different​ ​trains​ ​of​ ​reasoning;​ ​Shakespeare’s​ ​choice of​ ​punctuation​ ​emphasizes​ ​Hamlet's​ ​struggle​ ​of​ ​reason​ ​against​ ​emotion. Also,​ ​Hamlet’s​ ​impassioned​ ​tone​ ​is​ ​shown​ ​through​ ​the​ ​punctuation,​ ​as​ ​there​ ​are​ ​many​ ​exclamation points​ ​throughout​ ​the​ ​soliloquy. ...
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