Chapt5 fall 07

Chapt5 fall 07 - Chemistry 1035 - General Chemistry Chapter...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chemistry 1035 - General Chemistry Chapter 5 Fall 2007 Professor John G. Dillard 406A Davidson Hall 231-6926 john.dillard@vt.edu Review Sessions: Tuesday, 6:30-8:00 pm Wednesday, 8:30-10:00 pm Davidson Hall - Room 3
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 Pressure Gas laws Boyle – gas volume/pressure Charles – gas volume/temperature Avogadro – gas volume/moles Ideal gas law Dalton – partial pressure Gas measurements and stoichiometry Kinetic molecular theory Effusion and diffusion Real gases – deviation from ideal behavior
Background image of page 2
Gases – some concepts and properties Gases occupy the volume of the container into which they are placed. Gases diffuse readily and thus mix with other gases. Gases exert pressure on their surroundings. Gases can be compressed and can be converted to liquids or solids. Gases will dissolve in liquids and in solids. Gases exist above the surface of liquids and some solids.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gases - pressure The force per unit area exerted by a gas atmospheric pressure pressure in a balloon pressure in a tire pressure in a soft drink can or bottle pressure in a “pressurized” aircraft cabin pressure in an aerosol can pressure in a refrigeration unit
Background image of page 4
Gases - pressure Since pressure is a force per unit area, a more modern unit for pressure is Newtons/meter 2 or a pascal, abbreviated Pa. Standard atmospheric pressure in various units is = 1 atm = 760 mm Hg = 760 torr = 101,325 Pa or ~10 5 Pa.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gases – measurement and units of gas pressure The force per unit area exerted by a gas Pressure is measured using a barometer. The barometer was invented by Torricelli in the 1600s The device was a tube filled with and inverted in a pool of mercury (Hg). The force of atmospheric gases on the surface of the liquid forced liquid Hg to rise in the tube – a measure of atmospheric pressure. The height of the Hg column at sea level was about 760 mm or 760 torr or 1 atmosphere
Background image of page 6
Gases – measurement of pressure Closed-end manometer Open-end manometer Measurements at constant T
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gases –variation of volume with pressure at constant T Boyle (~1660) investigated the variation of gas volume (at constant temperature and constant amount of gas) as a function of pressure. The results of the experiments indicated that the volume of the gas decreased as pressure increased and volume of the gas increased as pressure decreased. This variation could be expressed in the equation pressure X volume = constant This variation is also given in graphical form: next slide
Background image of page 8
Boyle’s law: variation of gas volume with pressure PV = constant P = constant (1/V) Gases –variation of volume with pressure at constant T
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gases –variation of volume with temperature Charles (~1787) investigated the variation of gas volume (at constant pressure and constant amount of gas) as a function of temperature. The results of the experiments revealed that the
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 46

Chapt5 fall 07 - Chemistry 1035 - General Chemistry Chapter...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online