c181v1 study guide ch 3.docx - Study Guide Survey of United...

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Study Guide Survey of United States Government and Constitution C181 Study Guide How to Use this Study Guide This document is a guided study plan to help you refine your studying as you progress toward the objective assessment. This guide is not a substitute for a thorough reading of the material; it is just to help you identify areas to critically think about so you can be successful in this course. Tips for using this guide : Answer the questions as you read through the learning resource. Remember, the section and sub-section headings in the chapters are a useful way to identify the main points in the chapter. If you feel that you still need additional help, contact the course mentor. Prior to taking the assessment, review the guide to help you study. __________________________________________________________________________________ Chapter 3: The Constitution __________________________________________________________________________________ Before the Declaration of Independence, many governments were established by heredity and thought to be chosen by God, giving them absolute power. John Locke’s idea of the social contract theory refuted this idea, and instead argued that the PEOPLE had inalienable rights that could not be taken away and more power to choose their leaders. Moreover, John Locke took issue with Thomas Hobbes notion of the social contract. Whereas Hobbes stressed that the ruler should never be challenged and the power flowed from the ruler to the citizens, Locke argued that the power flowed upward from the citizens and that the people ultimately held the power. Hobbes also believed that, upon entering into the social contract, the people gave over their power permanently to the government. On the other hand, Locke felt that the people retained the power. This supports the Lockean ideal of popular sovereignty. Section 3.1- The Revolutionary Roots of the Constitution Answer the following questions: 1. What is social contract theory? (declaration of independence from rule of Great Britian) The belief that the people agree to set up rulers for certain purposes and thus have the right to resist or remove rulers who act against those purposes. 2. What connections do you see between social contract theory and the ideas and language of the Declaration of independence, in an excerpt from it below? “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness...To secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed… Whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government...” That governments are created by the people and for the people and that the purpose of government is to, indeed protect the rights that every person is born with and thusly entitled to.
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