Fisheries - The collapse of the fisheries 1 Technology is a...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The collapse of the fisheries 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Technology is a broad concept that deals with a branch of knowledge and the use of that knowledge to create tools and crafts to deal with life, society, and the environment. Technology can be considered a consequence of engineering and science, though when used for human activity tends to pave the way for both those fields (The Intute Consortium, 2007). An example of this is that scientists used already existing knowledge and tools to study the flow of electrons. They are using existing technology to study something and gaining new knowledge from it to create other technologies to study it further or do something greater with it. Technology has affected our society in a number of ways. Technology has allowed the growing of leisure class and helped develop economies that are more advanced. However, there are consequences to technology such as unwanted by-products like pollution or a depletion of our natural resources. An example is the rise of the notion of efficiency in terms of human productivity, such as increasing the technologies in fisheries and depleting the abundance of fish that used to reside there. Europeans first started fishing off Newfoundland sometime during the sixteenth century (Historica Foundation of Canada, 2007). Cod was the most valuable product because it was easy to catch and plentiful. Whether it was salted or dried, it could be transported for long distances and kept fresh for several months. The fisherman would arrive sometime in the spring and stay until early fall and they would fish right off the boats using lines and hooks. However, by the end of the sixteen century, the French and the English were the chief rivals. Since fishing, shipping, shipbuilding, and trading economically strengthen one another; the fishery pushed the growth of their empires. 2
Background image of page 2
At first, the English fishery was clustered together in semi-permanent fishing stations in multiple protected harbors on Newfoundland’s southeast coast. Fish were caught in small boats close to shore and the day’s catch was put directly onto a “stage” where the fish were then cleaned, split, and salted lightly. After, they were dried on open tables, called
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Fisheries - The collapse of the fisheries 1 Technology is a...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online