The American Revolution Summary.docx - THE AMERICAN...

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THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 1 The American Revolution Name Course Professor’s Name University City (State) Date
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 2 The American Revolution The American Revolution is a book written by 1 Gordon S. Wood. The American Revolution and American War of Independence played an important role in the formation of the United States of America as we see it today. The American Revolution is a period from 1775 to 1783 (Wood, 2011). In 1772, Samuel Adams created the first 2 Committee of Correspondence and within a year the committee led to dozens of similar discussion groups throughout the colonies. These isolated groups also came together to facilitate the exchange of ideas, provide invaluable information, and organize colonial voices of opposition. In 1774, The Continental Congress was formed after the Boston Tea Party and Intolerable Acts. By 1775, colonial resentment in many cities and towns caused the organization of volunteer militias, who began to drill openly in public common areas (Davidson, 1941). On April 19, 1775, a British commander dispatched troops to seize an arsenal of colonial militia weapons stored in Concord. The British arrived in Concord only to be ambushed by the Concord militia in the battle, famously known as the War of Lexington and Concord. It was a success for Americans as more than 270 were killed from the British troops, compared to approximately 100 Americans (Bailyn, 2012). In June 1775, the Battle of Bunker Hill was fought outside Boston in which the British ultimately emerged victorious. However, they suffered over 1,000 casualties, prompting British officials to take the colonial unrest far more seriously than they had taken previously. Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin and John Adams were some of the people who played an important role in the American Revolution. The revolution was followed by the Revolutionary War, an assemblage of many events like the Battle of Saratoga 1777, the unification of France and United States from the Franco- 1 Gordon S Wood is Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University, and the recipient of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Radicalism of the American Revolution

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