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16 - 1 Cognitive Development in Adolescence 2 Definition of...

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1 1 Cognitive Development in Adolescence March 20, 2007 2 Definition of Cognitive Development square6 Cognitive development refers to the development of the ability to think and reason. square6 Children (6-to-12 years old) develop the ability to think in concrete ways (concrete operations) such as: square6 How to combine (addition), separate (subtract or divide), order (alphabetize and sort), and transform (change things such as 5 pennies=1 nickel) objects and actions. square6 These are called concrete because they are performed in the presence of the objects and events being thought about. 3 Cognitive Development in Adolescence square6 Adolescence marks the beginning development of more complex thinking processes (also called formal logical operations) including: square6 abstract thinking (thinking about possibilities) square6 the ability to reason from known principles (form new ideas or questions) square6 the ability to consider many points of views according to varying criteria (compare or debate ideas or opinions) square6 the ability to think about the process of thinking. 4 Cognitive Development in Adolescence (continued) square6 During adolescence (between 12 and 18 years of age), the developing teenager acquires the ability to think systematically about all logical relationships within a problem. square6 The transition from concrete thinking to formal logical operations occurs over time.
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  • Spring '08
  • Gipson-Tansil
  • Thought, Theory of cognitive development, Kohlberg's stages of moral development, healthy cognitive development

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