1 - MIT OpenCourseWare http/ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles of...

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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005 Please use the following citation format: Sylvia Ceyer and Christopher Cummins, 5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare). http://ocw.mit.edu (accessed MM DD, YYYY). License: Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike. Note: Please use the actual date you accessed this material in your citation. For more information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms
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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005 Transcript – Lecture 1 What I am going to do today is I am going to start talking about the development of atomic theory. I am going to whiz through what the evidence is for the existence of atoms. And then we are going to talk about how the atom is not the most basic constituent of matter, how the atom can be divided into at least an electron and a nucleus. And then what we are going to see is how the existing classical way of thinking, Newtonian mechanics cannot explain how that electron and that nucleus hangs together. And, later on in the course, we are going to see how that existing classical physics is not going to be able to explain how two atoms hang together. We are going to look at the fundamental principles here of chemical bonding. I am going to get going on this subject. Then about three- quarters of the way through, I am going to stop. And then I will do some introductions of our teaching team this semester. And then also we will talk about the mechanics of the course and some expectations of the course. Let's get going. Certainly, the Ancient Greeks were known to have pondered whether matter can be divided ad infinitum into smaller and smaller pieces, chopped up into smaller and smaller pieces, or whether there was a point at which you couldn't chop up matter any further. Aristotle over here was one of those philosophers who believed that matter was infinitely divisible. You could chop it up ad infinitum. This is called the continuum theory of matter. It is a continuum. There is no discreteness to matter. That was his view of the structure of matter, but there was a minority opinion. An opinion actually held by Democritus who was 100 years older than Aristotle. And Democritus believed that matter was composed of discrete particles called, in Greek, atomos, a meaning not, tomos meaning divisible, not divisible particles.
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Well, for whatever reason, Aristotle's continuum theory of prevailed all the way up to the 17th century. And here he is depicted by Raphael, the frescos on the walls in the Vatican holding court on the continuum theory of matter. But, at the same time that Raphael actually painted this picture, there
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This note was uploaded on 10/30/2008 for the course CHEM 5.112 taught by Professor Cummins during the Spring '08 term at Academy of Art University.

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1 - MIT OpenCourseWare http/ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles of...

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