3 - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles...

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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005 Please use the following citation format: Sylvia Ceyer and Christopher Cummins, 5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005 (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare). http://ocw.mit.edu (accessed MM DD, YYYY). License: Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike. Note: Please use the actual date you accessed this material in your citation. For more information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms
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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005 Transcript – Lecture 3 Let's pick up from where we were on Friday. We had discovered the nucleus. Now we were faced with the problem, as all the scientific community was in 1911, in trying to understand the structure of the atom. Where was the nucleus in the atom? Where was the electron? How were they bound? How did they hang together? And we talked about the fact that the electron in the nucleus, the force of interaction is the Coulomb force. And we started talking about how, at that time, the only equation of motion that was going t o allow up to figure out how the electron and nucleus moved under influence of this Coulomb force was Newton's equations of motion, in particular the Second Law, F=ma. And so, in order to apply that equation of motion, we needed a model for the atom. And what was the simplest and most obvious thing to do was to suggest the planetary model. After all, that is how the astronomical bodies moved around the sun. And so the model that is set up is one where this electron has a uniform circular motion around the nucleus with a well-defined radius, which we called R star. We said that given this, the acceleration was a constant. It was given by V squared over R. The linear velocity over R. We plugged that into F=ma, put in the Coulomb force, and from that were able to calculate the kinetic energy of that electron going around the nucleus. Well, the reason I want to calculate the kinetic energy from this model is because I want to ultimately calculate the total energy. And why I want to calculate the total energy is going to be obvious in just a few minutes. My goal is to get the total energy. Actually, I am using my notes from Friday because I didn't finish them. You may need to get them out.
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This will probably often be the case, is that I won't quite finish the notes from the other lecture. I will start out the next lecture where I left off, so you should bring your previous day's notes to class if, in fact, you use them during class. I want the kinetic energy plus the potential energy because I want both of them to add them up to get the total energy. I know the kinetic energy. Now, we need the potential energy. What
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This note was uploaded on 10/30/2008 for the course CHEM 5.112 taught by Professor Cummins during the Spring '08 term at Academy of Art University.

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3 - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu 5.112 Principles...

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