Blood pH - How Does Exercise Affect the Body? Heart rate,...

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QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. How Does Exercise Affect the Body? Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and cardiac output all increase. Blood flow to the heart, the muscles, and the skin increase. The body's metabolism becomes more active, producing CO 2 and H + in the muscles. We breathe faster and deeper to supply the oxygen required by this increased metabolism.
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How Does Exercise Affect the Body? with strenuous exercise, we exceed the oxygen supply. Generate lactic acid, which enters the blood stream. With time, our cardiac output and lung capacity increase, we can exercise longer and harder. The amount of muscle in the body increases, fat is burned to help fuel the increased metabolism. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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•During exercise, the muscles use up O 2 as they convert chemical energy in glucose to mechanical energy. This O 2 comes from hemoglobin in the blood. CO 2 and H + are produced during the breakdown of glucose, and are removed from the muscle via the blood. •The production and removal of CO 2 and H + , together with the use and transport of O 2 , cause chemical changes in the blood. These chemical changes, unless offset by other physiological functions, cause the pH of the blood to drop. Chemical Changes in the Blood During Exercise
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If the pH of the body gets too low (below 7.4), a condition known as acidosis results. This can be very serious, because many of the chemical reactions that occur in the body, especially those involving proteins, are pH-dependent. Ideally, the pH of the blood should be maintained at 7.4. If the pH drops below 6.8 or rises above 7.8, death may occur. Fortunately, we have buffers in the blood to protect against large changes in pH. Chemical Changes in the Blood During Exercise
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How Chemicals Are Exchanged in the Body QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. All cells in the body continually exchange chemicals ( e.g., nutrients, waste products, and ions) with the external fluid surrounding them. This external fluid, in turn, exchanges
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This note was uploaded on 11/04/2008 for the course BIOCHEM 1 taught by Professor Kashfi during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Old Westbury.

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Blood pH - How Does Exercise Affect the Body? Heart rate,...

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