COUN 5239 U4-A1 Theoretical Framework and Application final.docx - Running head THEORETICAL APPLICATION Theoretical Framework and Application I Juanita

COUN 5239 U4-A1 Theoretical Framework and Application final.docx

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Running head: THEORETICAL APPLICATION Theoretical Framework and Application IJuanita DuffyCOUN 5239Theories of Psychotherapy345 Twin Oak DriveAltoona, WI, 54720Telephone: (715) 553-1065Email: [email protected]Instructor: Dr. Sarah Spencer
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THEORETICAL APPLICATIONTheoretical AnalysisTheoretical OriginsThe person-centered approach focuses on the ability, knowledge, and strengths of clients to change their own lives and asserts that this is best accomplished through a strong and unconditional therapeutic relationship. This approach was developed in 1942 by Carl Rogers as an alternative to other more interpretative or direct approaches. In Rogers’ perspective, once a counselor is able to provide a genuine relationship, acceptance and care, and an accurate understanding of a client’s worldview, the client’s natural instinct for positive growth will be realized (Corey, 2013).Basic PhilosophiesThe person-centered approach is based in the humanistic philosophy that client’s become empowered for social and personal transformation in a growth-producing environment. Producing this environment is achieved by focusing on the clientrather than focusing on presenting issues of that client which are simply on-going struggles of the human condition (Corey, 2013). Rogers firmly believed that people are capable of self-direction, are resourceful, trustworthy, and are the experts in their own lives. Person-centered therapists may suggest techniques or advise a client but the way, that suggestions are delivered is essential. “Suggestions” are based in hearing the client, being “with”the client, and presenting within the client’s own frame of reference providing active support for further exploration on the client’sterms (Elliott, Bohart, Watson, & Greenberg, 2011).Some view this approach as a mechanism rather than a distinctive type of therapy, that it does not acquire research on effectiveness, and that it is often quite vague (Mason, 2009). This approach also may encourage a therapist to become passive, neglecting those clients who prefer 2
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THEORETICAL APPLICATIONmore direction or need and are capable of more counselor activity (Corey, 2013). However sincethe client is the focus, it seems to me that a therapist should not deter from making any adjustments in order to benefit such client even if that “adjustment” is not person-centered in the traditional or typicalsense.Knight (2007), examines this point and offers a valuable perspective to consider. According to Knight, this is called person-centered problem solving. Person-centered problem solving continues to provide unconditional positive regard, empathy, reflective listening, and genuineness while also integrating and encouragingthe client’screation of options by inviting the client to progress with change on his/her own level. These options are not presented in a cognitive-behavioral way; rather, they are presented in true person-centered style. Knight (2007), explains how problem solving within
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