Basic Uses of Focus Groups

Basic Uses of Focus Groups - Basic Uses of Focus Groups To...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Basic Uses of Focus Groups To learn what people know, believe, do or plan to do about certain issues, ideas, or in response to receiving specific information To stimulate ideas for developing a “product”, solving a problem, or defining messages and strategies for a communication/ community involvement campaign To "pretest" messages and/or their potential features (e.g. usability); or “pretest” preliminary drafts of materials
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Basic Uses of Focus Groups Cont. To help develop or pretest a survey or Q instrument (i.e. generate wording of items that have meaning to participants) -- or explore the results of a survey or Q To evaluate or interpret what happened with a communication program, specific materials, or other outreach effort To explore knowledge, attitudes, perceptions among different target groups/segments
Background image of page 2
Benefits of Focus Groups Allows for exploration among different groups Provides an unusual group setting, i.e. all people are encouraged to speak Allows for exploration of complex behavior and motivations Enables discussion to generate new ideas/topics while providing structure Allows you to see information in participants’ own words
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Considerations for Successful Focus Groups 1. Focus group methodology is appropriate for the questions at hand 2. Screening is thorough and recruiting is resourceful 3. Logistical set-up is convenient and welcoming for participants 1. Well structured discussion guide
Background image of page 4
1. Skilled moderating and a “safe” environment conducive to open discussion 2. Back-up records of the proceedings 3. Timely "debriefing" for the moderator and observers to confer on key findings 4. Analysis and coding have appropriate level of rigor Considerations for Successful Focus Groups Cont.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Determining How Many Groups to Conduct Consider who you want to hear from Degree of homogeneity/heterogeneity Resources available Complexity of study and analysis
Background image of page 6
Determining How Many Groups to Conduct Cont. “Rule of thumb” – 3 to 4 groups with any one type of participant pending saturation Saturation is point at which you have discovered/ heard the range of ideas, opinions, etc. and are not learning new information Multiple groups are needed to allow for analysis (i.e. patterns and themes across groups or differences)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Determining How Many Groups to Conduct Cont. In Toms River and Waukegan, we chose to do 3 groups each Both sites: “Officials” and “Highly Involved citizens” – two key stakeholder groups that are likely to have different perspectives and types of involvement Toms River: “General Public” who had shown some interest in the site (from site mailing list) Waukegan: “Latino Community” – because other stakeholders had expressed concerns about reaching out to this specific segment of the community
Background image of page 8
For Focus Groups Get a variety of people Heterogeneous to get range of opinions/ideas Get the “right” people- for specific groups
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course ADV 875 taught by Professor Keithadler during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

Page1 / 29

Basic Uses of Focus Groups - Basic Uses of Focus Groups To...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online