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Lecture13-10-11-2006-ASTR111-Weigel-Revised

Lecture13-10-11-2006-ASTR111-Weigel-Revised - Why are...

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Outline for 11 October (Thursday) Questions about Comparative Planetology (20 minutes) The Living Earth (Chapter 9 of text) (55 minutes)
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Why are craters circular … … if asteroids can strike the surface at angles? http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/science/cratering.html
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Take 10 minutes
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Review Questions For Topics Covered in Lecture and Reading 1. Do all the planets orbit the Sun in the same direction? Are all of the orbits circular? 2. What are the characteristics of a terrestrial planet? 3. What are the characteristics of a Jovian planet? 4. In what ways does Pluto not fit the usual classification of either terrestrial or Jovian planets? 5. What is meant by the average density of a planet? What does the average density of a planet tell us? 6. In what ways are the largest satellites similar to the terrestrial planets? In what ways are they different? 7. The absorption lines in the spectrum of a planet or satellite do not necessarily indicate the composition of the planet or satellite’s atmosphere. Why not. 8. Why are hydrogen and helium abundant in the atmospheres of the Jovian planets but present in only small amounts in the Earth’s atmosphere? 9. What is an asteroid? What is a comet? In what ways are these minor members of the solar system like or unlike the planets?
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Review Questions For Topics Covered in Lecture and Reading 1. What are the asteroid belt and the Kuiper belt? Where are they located? How do the objects found in these two regions compare? 2. What is the one piece of evidence that impact craters are actually caused by impacts? 3. What is the relationship between the extent to which a planet or satellite is cratered and the amount of geologic activity on that planet or satellite? 4. How do we know that the surface of Venus is older than the Earth’s surface but younger than the Moon’s surface? 5. Why do smaller worlds retain less of their internal heat? 6. How does the size of a terrestrial planet influence the amount of catering on the planets surface? 7. How is the magnetic field of a planet different from that of a bar magnet? Why is a large planet more likely to have a magnetic field than a small planet?
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Review Questions For Topics Covered in Lecture and Reading 1. Do all the planets orbit the Sun in the same direction? Yes, CCW. Are all of the orbits circular? No, but almost (elliptical).
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