lysistrata - 1Courtney Mitzak Dr. Spicka History 3 October...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1Courtney Mitzak Dr. Spicka History 3 October 2006 Lysistrata The play Lysistrata reflects Aristophanes’ view on women and politics in Athens, and in Greece in general. Athens and Sparta were in the midst of a long, drawn out war and everyone was getting weary. Lysistrata, determined to bring an end to the ongoing war, rounds up the women of Greece and proposes a vow of abstinence from sex. The women agree to oblige and they all take an oath to remain faithful. In a continued effort to end the war, they seize the acropolis and thus gain control of the State treasure. Throughout the play Aristophanes reflects on the subordinate role of women in Athens and by taking control Lysistrata and the women of Greece gain a new sense of who they are and what they can do. Today women have the freedom to do what they want, when they want to do it just like their male counterparts do. However that was not the case in Athens. Women in Athens were the inferior sex. They were treated more like property; they did not have any rights. Their position in society was to be seen and not heard. Women did not have a say in things and if they attempted to get involved they would be shot down. This is shown when Lysistrata addresses the commissioner. “...my husband would give his stock reply. “What’s that to you? Shut up!” And I
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

lysistrata - 1Courtney Mitzak Dr. Spicka History 3 October...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online