Oxford 3000.pdf - The Oxford 3000 The words which occur most frequently in English are included based on the information in the British National Corpus

Oxford 3000.pdf - The Oxford 3000 The words which occur...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 15 pages.

The Oxford 3000 d The Oxford 3000 The keywords of the Oxford 3000 have been carefully selected by a group of language experts and experienced teachers as the words which should receive priority in vocabulary study because of their importance and usefulness. The selection is based on three criteria. The words which occur most frequently in English are included, based on the information in the British National Corpus and the Oxford Corpus Collection. ( A corpus is an electronically held collection of written or spoken texts, often consisting of hundreds of millions of words. ) However, being frequent in the corpus alone is not enough for a word to qualify as a keyword: it may be that the word is used very frequently, but only in a narrowly defined area, such as newspapers or scientific articles. In order to avoid including these restricted words, we include as keywords only those words which are frequent across a range of different types of text. In other words, keywords are both frequent and used in a variety of contexts. In addition, the list includes some very important words which happen not to be used frequently, even though they are very familiar to most users of English. These include, for example, words for parts of the body, words used in travel, and words which are useful for explaining what you mean when you do not know the exact word for something. These words were identified by consulting a panel of over seventy experts in the fields of teaching and language study. The words of the Oxford 3000 are shown in the main section of the dictionary in larger print, and with a key symbol immediately following. On the CD-ROM the keywords are shown in red. The most useful parts of the entries (particular parts of speech, meanings, phrasal verbs and idioms) are marked with a small key symbol. The entries for keywords often have extra information in the form of more examples of use, special notes explaining synonyms or related words, or helpful illustrations. This means that the keywords make an excellent starting point for expanding your vocabulary. With most keywords, there is far more to learn about them than the first meaning in the entry: often these words have many meanings, have a large family of words d derived from them, or are used in a variety of patterns. All of this means that each one of the keywords repays close study. The list covers British and American English. It is arranged to emphasize the connections between words, so that words which are very closely related ( including adverbs ending in -ly and opposites starting with un- ) are grouped together. Some basic phrases are also included. Proper names ( names of people, places, etc. beginning with a capital letter ) and numbers are not included in the main list.
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 15 pages?

  • Spring '17
  • LoriLogala
  • English

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes