CrimeandPunishmentEssay.docx - Joe June ENC 1102-100 A central aspect that is evident in both Crime and Punishment and Madame Bovary is the power of

CrimeandPunishmentEssay.docx - Joe June ENC 1102-100 A...

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Joe June 10/13/09 ENC 1102-100 A central aspect that is evident in both Crime and Punishment and Madame Bovary is the power of love which many of the characters acquire and which determines how each character progresses through the book. In Crime and Punishment, the two main characters who are changed by the power of love are Raskolnikov and Svidrigailov, while in Madame Bovary, the three main characters are Emma, Charles, and Rodolphe. Each character had their own experience with love that produced an outcome of a rebirth, a death, or an expressionless solidity. Though each book are quite different, the power of love is similar in the way that it entertains each character and how it produces their future outcome, excluding Rodolphe, of which I will explain later. Raskolnikov is the protagonist in the Crime and Punishment and is also the character that I believe has the better outcome from the power of love than any of the other characters in the two books. Throughout the book, Raskolnikov struggles not with the guilt of his crime, but, rather, the fact that he cannot endure; that he is not an extraordinary man and does not have the right to kill a louse. He believed that he “didn't kill a human being, but a principle! I killed the principle, but I didn't overstep, I stopped on this side .... I was only capable of killing. And it seems I wasn't even capable of that” (Dostoevsky, 274). Throughout the book, Raskolnikov's life story gets entwined with the story of Sonya, a prostitute. She is the first person he confesses the murder to. He tries to make his case “whether [he is] a trembling creature or whether [he has] the right [to kill]” (Dostoevsky, 419). She then tells him that he must "…go at once, this very minute, stand at the cross-roads, bow down, first kiss the earth which you have defiled and then bow down to all the world and say to all men aloud, 'I am a murderer!'…” (Dostoevsky, 420). Eventually, he does make it to the cross-roads, he bows down, but “the words, "I am a murderer,"
Joe June 10/13/09 ENC 1102-100 which were perhaps on the point of dropping from his lips, died away.” (Dostoevsky, 525). In the epilogue, Raskolnikov was still ashamed that was not able to endure through the murder. He thought over and over that “he recognized [this] as his crime: that he had not endured it, but had gone and confessed.” (Dostoevsky, 544). He feels separated from the world and of society. One day, when Sonya comes to visit him, he realizes that he is in love, “how it happened he did not know. But all at once something seemed to seize him and fling him at her feet. He wept and threw his arms round her knees…She knew and had no doubt that he loved her beyond everything and that at last the moment had come.” (Dostoevsky, 549). With Sonya, “everything, even his crime, his sentence and imprisonment, seemed to him now, in the first impulse, to be some strange, external fact, as if it had not even happened to him.” (Dostoevsky, 550). The love that was between them was more powerful than his inability to endure his crime, his sentencing, and his punishment in hard labor. The happiness and love they had together gave them “moments

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