202 Chap 4 Latin America(2)

202 Chap 4 Latin America(2) - Chapter 4, Latin America Fig....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 4, Latin America
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fig. 4.1: Latin America Note complexity of tectonic plate boundaries between continental plates
Background image of page 2
Better described as Ibero-America Regional coherence comes from common settlement as part of periphery of European World-Economy. Search for exploitable crops Portuguese (after 1431), then Spanish (after 1492) [hence Iberian] push into Atlantic. Initial focus on Caribbean for its sugar potential Impact of Eurasian & African diseases. Death rates among indigenous population 95% or higher 1500-1600 Slave Trade to replace lost indigenous population Argentina, plus the whole of the wheat and beef South of Latin America, detached from Spain in early 1800s to become part of Britain’s “informal Empire”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Whole of area from Mexico south to northern South America unstable geologically with large number of tectonic plate boundaries--far less stable than North America Northern section particularly prone to major earthquakes and volcanic eruptions Mexico City in earthquake prone region and on very dangerous site (basically a filled in lake) River and coastal flooding are region’s main short-term environmental problems (flood amelioration in North American style using levees & dams on rivers rare)
Background image of page 4
Fig 4.3
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Environmental Issues Much of Latin America’s natural vegetation has been replaced by European imports. Region had few domesticated animals so most again European. See Ecological Imperialism by Alfred Crosby. Process most noticeable in southern grasslands used for wheat and beef cattle Population pressure lower than other developing world regions, but still serious (TFRs generally high 2s) Deforestation serious problem in Southern Amazon Basin, mainly to accommodate Brazilian expansion for food, cotton, tropical hardwoods (last two for income) Brazil in constant GATT fight w/US over cotton and soybeans
Background image of page 6
Fig. 4.14 Fig. 4.14
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Climate Northern section (Brazil to Mexico) part of Europe’s tropical world. Second only to Caribbean in historical economic importance. As usual, main crop sugar For its sugar plantations Brazil took 40% of all slaves taken out of Africa, thus late end to slavery (1888) Rubber plant originated in the Amazon Basin, later transferred unsuccessfully to Africa, successfully to Southeast Asia via Kew Gardens Southern section (South of Brazil) colonized as part of Europe’s temperate periphery, growing wheat and beef. Argentina was the world’s wealthiest country in PPP/capita by 1900
Background image of page 8
Fig 4.15: Altitudinal Zonation
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Altitudinal Zonation Provides complex internal structure for indigenous agriculture and crops from all climatic regions in very small geographic area. Fish protein from sea important to Inca Three main historical/geographic regions Maya Toltec-Aztec Inca Altitude Zonation still important today in former Inca Andean coast region. Historically important in former Maya Yucatan and former Toltec-Aztec Mexico
Background image of page 10
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 38

202 Chap 4 Latin America(2) - Chapter 4, Latin America Fig....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online