Chapter 2 - Broadcasting, Cable, the Internet, and Beyond...

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Broadcasting, Cable, the Internet, and Beyond An Introduction to Modern Electronic Media I Joseph R. DominickFritz Messere Barry L. Sherman Chapter 2 History of Cable, Home Video, and the Internet The Story of Cable TV Cable started in rural towns such as Astoria, Oregon and Lansford, Pennsylvania Community Antenna TV literally was a sharing of a common antenna system to pick up television signals By 1952, about 70 cable systems were serving 15,000 homes in the U.S. EMERGENCE OF CABLE TV Boosters Translators CATV First seen by broadcasters as a positive Later as unfair competition CATV First seen by broadcasters as a positive Later as unfair competition PAY TV EXPERIMENTS Phonevision Skiatron Telemeter Bartlesville, OK Experiment Cable Growth -- Technical and Regulatory Early on the FCC avoided regulating cable and decided it was really an ancillary service to broadcast television In 1972, the FCC established more formal rules Local communities, states and the FCC were to regulate cable New systems would have a minimum of 20 channels There would be carriage of all local stations (must carry) There would be regulations on importing distant signals Pay cable services would be approved
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Imposed access channel requirements Cable Growth -- Technical and Regulatory 1972 Open Skies Policy Anyone with the means could launch a domsat. Satellite distribution of signals made it possible to distribute programming to local cable franchises In 1975, HBO became the first pay service distributed via satellite Cable Growth -- Technical and Regulatory (Cont.) 1977 - Appeals court rules there is no justification for treating cable as ancillary service Pendulum swings back toward hands-off 1979 FCC action removing licensing requirements for TVRO antennas. The Cable Communications Act of 1984 reduced FCC control over cable made the local community the major force in cable regulation Large companies rushed to get local franchise rights to build cable systems Cable Growth -- Technical and Regulatory (Cont.) 1992 Cable Television Consumer Protection & Competition Act
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2008 for the course RTVF 1310 taught by Professor Way during the Spring '08 term at North Texas.

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Chapter 2 - Broadcasting, Cable, the Internet, and Beyond...

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