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College of the Mainland Research Paper: The Cuban Missile Crisis Erin Lange U.S. History 1302 Professor Ovesny April 20, 2017
The Cuban Missile Crisis lasted from October 16, 1962 to October 28, 1962. It was a span of 13 days during the Cold War, were the United States and the Soviet Union were on the closest brink of a nuclear war. During this time, many tribulations struck President Kennedy, and caused many problems with him and his administration. Because of this immense stress that was throughout the White House, and the country, this crisis was not a small one. This was a power struggle between the Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev and President John F. Kennedy. “Memories of the Bay of Pigs also weighed heavily on Kennedy. The United States had been humiliated by the earlier failure ( Khrushchev, Nikita S.).” The CIA had trained Cuban exiles to form an Anti-Castro uprising, but they had failed in realizing that Castro would think they were not fully attacking, but thought they were leading to a full on invasion of Castro’s forces. With the poor planning and bad preparedness, 1400 Cuban exiles were captured by Castro. Because of this, there was more involvement with the Soviet Union soldiers coming over and staying in Cuba. This initially caused the Soviet and Cuban governments to begin to secretly build bases in Cuba for a small range ballistic nuclear missiles that could attack nearly anywhere in the United States. On 29 August photographs from a U-2 reconnaissance plane provided the first evidence of SAM sites. But a Soviet spokesman on 2 September merely said that the Soviet Union had agreed to provide armaments in response to a Cuban request for assistance, and he implied that the SAMs were for a defensive purpose only. On 4 September Soviet Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin called on President Kennedy's brother, Robert, the attorney general, and assured him that the Soviet Union would create no problems for the United States during the fall election campaign. That same day President Kennedy publicly announced that the introduction of Soviet missiles into Cuba would raise issues of the "gravest" kind. On 6 September Dobrynin met with presidential adviser Theodore Sorensen to repeat his earlier promise of no Soviet interference in American ‘internal affairs’ ( The Cold War--1945-1991 ) " It started when an American U-2 spy plane secretly photographed Soviet nuclear missiles being built on Cuban grounds. The Soviet Union and Cuban officials knew that when the United States found out about this, there would certainly be an invasion from the U.S. When this was
brought to Kennedy’s attention, he did not want Khrushchev to know he had discovered the missiles, because he knew they would really get ready for a strike and he wanted to see what they were doing secretly. The first thing Kennedy did was have a secret meeting with his advisors. “The president convened a small group of trusted advisers, called the Executive

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