APUSH Unit VI LEQ Topics.pdf - Long Essay Questions 1...

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Unformatted text preview: Long​ ​Essay​ ​Questions 1. Compare​ ​and​ ​contrast​ ​the​ ​beliefs​ ​of​ ​Booker​ ​T.​ ​Washington​ ​and​ ​W.E.B.​ ​Du​ ​Bois​ ​in the​ ​late​ ​19th​ ​centuries.​ ​In​ ​you​ ​opinion,​ ​which​ ​man’s​ ​belief​ ​was​ ​more​ ​realistic​ ​in​ ​the context​ ​of​ ​the​ ​time​ ​in​ ​which​ ​they​ ​were​ ​living? a. Booker​ ​T.​ ​Washington​:​ ​Born​ ​into​ ​slavery,​ ​Booker​ ​T.​ ​Washington’s​ ​early​ ​life​ ​and education​ ​did​ ​much​ ​to​ ​influence​ ​his​ ​stance​ ​on​ ​the​ ​life​ ​of​ ​blacks​ ​during​ ​this​ ​period after​ ​the​ ​Civil​ ​War.​ ​After​ ​the​ ​Civil​ ​War,​ ​Washington​ ​was​ ​educated​ ​in​ ​a​ ​black school​ ​known​ ​as​ ​the​ ​Hampton​ ​Institute.​ ​After​ ​completing​ ​his​ ​education​ ​he​ ​would then​ ​be​ ​selected​ ​as​ ​the​ ​head​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Tuskegee​ ​Normal,​ ​a​ ​vocational​ ​school​ ​that sought​ ​to​ ​give​ ​African​ ​Americans​ ​the​ ​necessary​ ​moral​ ​instruction​ ​and​ ​practical work​ ​skills​ ​needed​ ​to​ ​make​ ​the,​ ​successful​ ​in​ ​the​ ​work​ ​force. ■ He​ ​believed​ ​that​ ​it​ ​was​ ​economic​ ​independence​ ​and​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​show themselves,​ ​as​ ​blacks,​ ​to​ ​be​ ​productive​ ​members​ ​in​ ​society,​ ​and​ ​that​ ​they should​ ​set​ ​aside​ ​any​ ​demands​ ​of​ ​civil​ ​rights. ■ His​ ​ideas​ ​were​ ​accepted​ ​by​ ​blacks​ ​who​ ​believed​ ​that​ ​the​ ​rationality​ ​and realistic​ ​ideal​ ​of​ ​his​ ​approach.​ ​Additionally,​ ​whites​ ​were​ ​more​ ​delighted​ ​to avoid​ ​equality​ ​and​ ​tedious​ ​approaches​ ​to​ ​rights. b. W.E.B.​ ​Du​ ​Bois​:​ ​Born​ ​into​ ​a​ ​freed​ ​family,​ ​Du​ ​Bois​ ​had​ ​never​ ​experienced​ ​the horrors​ ​of​ ​slavery.​ ​He​ ​attended​ ​schools​ ​and​ ​even​ ​excelled​ ​as​ ​valedictorian​ ​in​ ​his class.​ ​However,​ ​when​ ​attending​ ​school​ ​in​ ​the​ ​South,​ ​Du​ ​Bois​ ​encountered​ ​the oppression​ ​within​ ​the​ ​Jim​ ​Crows​ ​Laws,​ ​in​ ​which​ ​this​ ​being​ ​an​ ​impactful experience​ ​for​ ​it​ ​changed​ ​his​ ​way​ ​of​ ​thinking.​ ​He​ ​would​ ​then​ ​move​ ​safer​ ​into​ ​the North​ ​and​ ​come​ ​to​ ​attend​ ​Harvard​ ​University​ ​where​ ​he​ ​would​ ​be​ ​the​ ​first​ ​black​ ​to graduate​ ​there. ■ He​ ​believed​ ​that​ ​blacks​ ​should​ ​receive​ ​immediate​ ​equality.​ ​Additionally, he​ ​believed​ ​that​ ​a​ ​higher​ ​education​ ​was​ ​the​ ​key​ ​to​ ​lasting​ ​gains​ ​for African​ ​Americans. c. Which​ ​man’s​ ​belief​ ​was​ ​more​ ​realistic​ ​in​ ​the​ ​context​ ​of​ ​the​ ​time​ ​in​ ​which​ ​they were​ ​living? ■ In​ ​my​ ​opinion,​ ​Booker​ ​T.​ ​Washington’s​ ​belief​ ​is​ ​most​ ​realistic​ ​during​ ​this period​ ​after​ ​the​ ​Civil​ ​War​ ​because​ ​after​ ​the​ ​immediate​ ​emancipation​ ​of slaves​ ​in​ ​the​ ​South,​ ​this​ ​highly​ ​agricultural​ ​region​ ​was​ ​not​ ​expected​ ​to give​ ​blacks​ ​equality​ ​due​ ​to​ ​the​ ​more​ ​significant​ ​problems​ ​surrounding​ ​the nation​ ​as​ ​a​ ​whole.​ ​As​ ​we​ ​know,​ ​Reconstruction​ ​of​ ​the​ ​South​ ​was​ ​the​ ​most prominent​ ​concentration​ ​that​ ​the​ ​nation​ ​needed,​ ​not​ ​the​ ​further​ ​equality​ ​of blacks.​ ​With​ ​W.E.B.​ ​Du​ ​Bois’s​ ​belief,​ ​it​ ​was​ ​more​ ​realistic​ ​to​ ​encourage blacks​ ​to​ ​receive​ ​a​ ​higher​ ​education—not​ ​immediate​ ​equality.​ ​With Washington’s​ ​belief,​ ​even​ ​whites​ ​were​ ​pleased,​ ​making​ ​it​ ​a​ ​more​ ​rational approach​ ​for​ ​blacks​ ​to​ ​take. 2. Compare​ ​and​ ​contrast​ ​the​ ​competing​ ​ideas​ ​of​ ​self-interest​ ​and​ ​idealism​ ​as motivating​ ​factors​ ​for​ ​American​ ​foreign​ ​policy​ ​in​ ​the​ ​years​ ​1890-1917. a. Self-interest​:​ ​This​ ​was​ ​a​ ​practical​ ​practice​ ​in​ ​which​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​imperialized countries​ ​for​ ​the​ ​United​ ​State’s​ ​own​ ​benefit,​ ​for​ ​national​ ​security,​ ​a​ ​maintenance with​ ​balance​ ​or​ ​power,​ ​and​ ​for​ ​economic​ ​interest.​ ​Examples​ ​include: ■ Navy​:​ ​a​ ​powerful​ ​Navy​ ​was​ ​needed​ ​to​ ​protect​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States, alongside​ ​the​ ​need​ ​for​ ​ports​ ​to​ ​refuel​ ​around​ ​the​ ​world.​ ​The​ ​United​ ​States gained​ ​the​ ​Panama​ ​Canal​ ​by​ ​interfering​ ​with​ ​Colombia​ ​and​ ​Panama. Initially,​ ​FDR​ ​tried​ ​to​ ​buy​ ​the​ ​rights​ ​to​ ​build​ ​the​ ​Panama​ ​Canal,​ ​but​ ​were denied,​ ​afterwards,​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​would​ ​use​ ​ingenuous​ ​means​ ​to attain​ ​the​ ​canal​ ​through​ ​helping​ ​the​ ​cause​ ​for​ ​the​ ​Panamanian​ ​revolution. ■ Markets​:​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​needed​ ​new​ ​places​ ​to​ ​sell​ ​foods​ ​to​ ​and​ ​to attain​ ​natural​ ​resources​ ​from.​ ​In​ ​Hawaii,​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​overthrew​ ​the monarchy​ ​to​ ​keep​ ​the​ ​markets. ■ Power​:​ ​The​ ​United​ ​States​ ​wanted​ ​to​ ​compete​ ​with​ ​other​ ​countries​ ​who​ ​of which​ ​had​ ​vast​ ​amounts​ ​of​ ​colonies. b. Idealism​:​ ​This​ ​was​ ​a​ ​moral​ ​and​ ​ethical​ ​practice​ ​centered​ ​on​ ​heaping​ ​the​ ​causes for​ ​human​ ​rights,​ ​introduction​ ​of​ ​democracy,​ ​aiding​ ​in​ ​fights​ ​for​ ​freedom,​ ​ending conflicts,​ ​and​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​saving​ ​lives.​ ​Examples​ ​include: ■ The​ ​White​ ​Man’s​ ​Burden​:​ ​This​ ​novel​ ​by​ ​Rudyard​ ​Kipling​ ​centered​ ​on​ ​the idea​ ​that​ ​it​ ​is​ ​the​ ​duty​ ​of​ ​the​ ​white​ ​race​ ​to​ ​help​ ​all​ ​others​ ​who​ ​are​ ​not white,​ ​for​ ​these​ ​different​ ​people​ ​were​ ​savages. ■ Religion​:​ ​Many​ ​missionaries​ ​wanted​ ​to​ ​expand​ ​into​ ​other​ ​national​ ​HS​ ​in order​ ​to​ ​spread​ ​Christianity. ■ Helping​ ​the​ ​Western​ ​Hemisphere​:​ ​The​ ​Roosevelt​ ​Corollary,​ ​in​ ​extension of​ ​the​ ​Monroe​ ​Doctrine,​ ​states​ ​that​ ​if​ ​any​ ​nation​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Western Hemisphere​ ​appeared​ ​politically​ ​and​ ​fiscally​ ​unstable​ ​and​ ​vulnerable​ ​to European​ ​control,​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​had​ ​the​ ​right​ ​to​ ​intervene. ■ Reconcentration​ ​Camps​:​ ​Inside​ ​the​ ​Spanish​ ​American​ ​War​ ​of​ ​1898, Spain​ ​instituted​ ​Reconcentration​ ​camps​ ​in​ ​Cuba.​ ​They​ ​had​ ​forced Cubans​ ​into​ ​these​ ​camps​ ​to​ ​keep​ ​them​ ​from​ ​helping​ ​rebels.​ ​About​ ​a​ ​third of​ ​the​ ​people​ ​in​ ​these​ ​camps​ ​had​ ​died​ ​of​ ​starvation.​ ​However,​ ​when America​ ​won​ ​the​ ​war​ ​against​ ​Spain,​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​received​ ​and saved​ ​Cuba,​ ​Puerto​ ​Rico,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Philippines​ ​from​ ​the​ ​Spanish. c. Comparison​:​ ​Both​ ​these​ ​ideas​ ​were​ ​used​ ​when​ ​America​ ​had​ ​began​ ​to​ ​practice imperialism​ ​during​ ​1890-1917.​ ​However,​ ​the​ ​earlier​ ​part​ ​of​ ​this​ ​race​ ​for Imperialism​ ​was​ ​dominated​ ​by​ ​self-interest​ ​while​ ​the​ ​end​ ​of​ ​this​ ​period​ ​had aspects​ ​of​ ​idealism.​ ​Overall,​ ​self-interest​ ​dominated​ ​American​ ​Imperialism. 3. “Actually​ ​Theodore​ ​Roosevelt​ ​was​ ​a​ ​conservative​ ​and​ ​accomplished​ ​very​ ​little​ ​in terms​ ​of​ ​reform.”​ ​To​ ​what​ ​extent​ ​is​ ​historical​ ​interpretation​ ​accurate? a. This​ ​claim​ ​of​ ​Theodore​ ​Roosevelt​ ​being​ ​a​ ​conservative​ ​and​ ​accomplishing​ ​very little​ ​in​ ​terms​ ​of​ ​reform​ ​are​ ​false​ ​because: ■ In​ ​the​ ​realm​ ​of​ ​conservativeness​:​ ​Theodore​ ​Roosevelt​ ​broke​ ​free​ ​from​ ​his conservative​ ​shackles​ ​through​ ​trust-busting​ ​and​ ​hostility​ ​to​ ​big businesses.​ ​Additionally,​ ​Roosevelt​ ​excessively​ ​used​ ​his​ ​executive​ ​order to​ ​get​ ​around​ ​Congress. ● Roosevelt​ ​wanted​ ​to​ ​investigate​ ​large​ ​corporations,​ ​but​ ​only​ ​for the​ ​ones​ ​that​ ​he​ ​had​ ​considered​ ​bad,​ ​these​ ​included​ ​large corporations​ ​who​ ​had​ ​the​ ​goal​ ​of​ ​self-interest​ ​and​ ​not​ ​the​ ​public good.​ ​His​ ​solution​ ​was​ ​a​ ​regulation,​ ​not​ ​elimination​ ​of combinations​ ​and​ ​trusts. ● His​ ​administration​ ​filed​ ​40​ ​anti-trust​ ​suits​ ​against​ ​corporations, even​ ​dissolving​ ​J.​ ​P.​ ​Morgan’s​ ​company. ■ In​ ​the​ ​realm​ ​of​ ​reformation​:​ ​Roosevelt​ ​created​ ​his​ ​Square​ ​Deal,​ ​which included​ ​three​ ​main​ ​points:​ ​control​ ​of​ ​the​ ​corporations,​ ​consumer protection,​ ​and​ ​conservation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​environment. ● Control​ ​of​ ​the​ ​corps​:​ ​Roosevelt​ ​filed​ ​40​ ​anti-trusts​ ​to​ ​several companies​ ​that​ ​were​ ​untrustworthy,​ ​being​ ​that​ ​these​ ​companies only​ ​served​ ​for​ ​their​ ​own​ ​benefit,​ ​not​ ​for​ ​the​ ​benefit​ ​of​ ​the​ ​society. ● Consumer​ ​protection​:​ ​after​ ​the​ ​release​ ​of​ ​the​ ​novel​ ​The​ ​Jungle​, the​ ​realities​ ​of​ ​the​ ​meat​ ​industry​ ​were​ ​exposed.​ ​In​ ​consequence​ ​to this​ ​unlawful​ ​business​ ​practice,​ ​Roosevelt​ ​passed​ ​two​ ​laws,​ ​them being​ ​the​ ​Meat​ ​Inspection​ ​Act,​ ​which​ ​stated​ ​that​ ​federal​ ​inspection and​ ​regulation​ ​of​ ​mean​ ​was​ ​necessary.​ ​With​ ​the​ ​Pure​ ​Food​ ​and Drug​ ​Act,​ ​companies​ ​needed​ ​to​ ​accurately​ ​label​ ​their​ ​food​ ​and drugs. ● Conservation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​environment​:​ ​Although​ ​Roosevelt​ ​was​ ​a preservationist​ ​at​ ​heart,​ ​he​ ​knew​ ​that​ ​conservation​ ​of​ ​the environment​ ​was​ ​the​ ​most​ ​realistic​ ​approach​ ​he​ ​could​ ​take.​ ​This being​ ​said,​ ​to​ ​conserve​ ​the​ ​environment​ ​means​ ​to​ ​carefully​ ​use valuable​ ​natural​ ​substances​ ​that​ ​exist​ ​in​ ​limited​ ​amounts​ ​in​ ​order to​ ​make​ ​certain​ ​that​ ​they​ ​will​ ​be​ ​available​ ​for​ ​as​ ​long​ ​as​ ​possible. b. Essentially,​ ​through​ ​his​ ​Square​ ​Deal,​ ​which​ ​centered​ ​on​ ​control​ ​of​ ​the​ ​corps, consumer​ ​protection,​ ​and​ ​conservation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​environment,​ ​Roosevelt​ ​created​ ​a stepping​ ​stone​ ​for​ ​Franklin​ ​D.​ ​Roosevelt’s​ ​New​ ​Deal​ ​during​ ​the​ ​Great​ ​Depression which​ ​centered​ ​on​ ​relief,​ ​recovery,​ ​and​ ​reformation. 4. To​ ​what​ ​extent​ ​did​ ​the​ ​Progressive​ ​Era​ ​show​ ​elements​ ​of​ ​continuity​ ​and​ ​change from​ ​previous​ ​reform​ ​movements​ ​in​ ​United​ ​States​ ​history? a. The​ ​Progressive​ ​Era​ ​showed​ ​elements​ ​of​ ​continuity​ ​and​ ​change​ ​from​ ​previous reform​ ​movements​ ​in​ ​the​ ​history​ ​of​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States​ ​because​ ​it​ ​was​ ​a continuation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Populist​ ​Party,​ ​which​ ​believed​ ​in​ ​supporting​ ​the​ ​farmer instead​ ​of​ ​the​ ​businessman,​ ​and​ ​a​ ​change​ ​from​ ​previous​ ​reform​ ​movements​ ​for the​ ​Populists’​ ​technique​ ​in​ ​achieving​ ​their​ ​goals​ ​is​ ​only​ ​unique​ ​to​ ​them. b. Continuity​:​ ​Populists​ ​believed​ ​that​ ​they​ ​needed​ ​to​ ​curb​ ​the​ ​uncontrolled​ ​power​ ​of industrialists​ ​and​ ​that​ ​they​ ​needed​ ​to​ ​see​ ​change​ ​in​ ​which​ ​the​ ​lives​ ​of​ ​the downtrodden​ ​are​ ​improved. c. Change​:​ ​The​ ​Progressive​ ​era​ ​showed​ ​elements​ ​of​ ​change​ ​from​ ​previous​ ​reform movements​ ​in​ ​the​ ​history​ ​of​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States.​ ​The​ ​following​ ​changes​ ​are: ■ Those​ ​who​ ​joined​ ​that​ ​party​:​ ​Social​ ​scientists,​ ​journalists,​ ​writers,​ ​and​ ​the “muckrakers”​ ​who​ ​publicized​ ​industrial​ ​problems,​ ​making​ ​these​ ​issues known​ ​to​ ​the​ ​public.​ ​This​ ​movement​ ​was​ ​based​ ​on​ ​the​ ​idea​ ​of​ ​science and​ ​knowledge​ ​and​ ​how​ ​it​ ​could​ ​solve​ ​problems. ● It​ ​was​ ​mostly​ ​held​ ​by​ ​the​ ​middle​ ​class. ■ Their​ ​way​ ​of​ ​expressing​ ​a​ ​need​ ​for​ ​change​:​ ​Several​ ​newspapers​ ​were​ ​in circulation​ ​wars​ ​at​ ​the​ ​turn​ ​of​ ​the​ century.​ ​Unlike​ ​the​ ​days​ ​of​ ​yellow journalism,​ ​the​ ​writers​ ​from​ ​this​ ​era​ ​were​ ​committed​ ​to​ ​providing​ ​accurate stories​ ​of​ ​corruption​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States. ● They​ ​focused​ ​on​ ​issues​ ​such​ ​as​ ​trusts,​ ​railroads,​ ​drug​ ​companies, prostitution,​ ​and​ ​child​ ​labor.​ ​These​ ​journalist​ ​were​ ​determined​ ​to highlight​ ​and​ ​illustrate​ ​the​ ​ills​ ​of​ ​industrialization​ ​within​ ​the​ ​United States. ■ Progressivism​ ​in​ ​the​ ​states​:​ ​The​ ​state's​ ​reform​ ​system​ ​was​ ​referred​ ​to “the​ ​lab​ ​of​ ​democracy”​ ​for​ ​the​ ​different​ ​attempts​ ​taking​ ​to​ ​secure​ ​power away​ ​from​ ​the​ ​government​ ​and​ ​capitalists​ ​and​ ​giving​ ​it​ ​back​ ​to​ ​the people.​ ​These​ ​include: ● Initiative​:​ ​voters​ ​can​ ​directly​ ​propose​ ​legislation. ● Referendum​:​ ​laws​ ​placed​ ​on​ ​the​ ​ballot​ ​for​ ​final​ ​approval. ● Recall​:​ ​Voters​ ​can​ ​remove​ ​unwanted​ ​elected​ ​officials. ● Australian​ ​ballot​:​ ​A​ ​secret​ ​ballot—remove​ ​the​ ​reach​ ​of​ ​the​ ​party boss. ■ The​ ​role​ ​of​ ​women​:​ ​women​ ​become​ ​the​ ​champions​ ​against​ ​the​ ​ills​ ​of industrialization.​ ​They​ ​would​ ​argue​ ​that​ ​those​ ​goals​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Progressive aim​ ​in​ ​the​ ​early​ ​20th​ ​century​ ​were​ ​not​ ​directed​ ​against​ ​the​ ​gender​ ​norms of​ ​the​ ​era,​ ​but​ ​rather​ ​an​ ​extension​ ​of​ ​their​ ​responsibility​ ​from​ ​the​ ​home. 5. The​ ​1920s​ ​has​ ​been​ ​described​ ​as​ ​an​ ​era​ ​of​ ​extreme​ ​change;​ ​to​ ​what​ ​extent​ ​is historical​ ​interpretation​ ​accurate? a. The​ ​1920s​ ​represented​ ​an​ ​era​ ​of​ ​extreme​ ​change​ ​from​ ​the​ ​modernization​ ​of lifestyle,​ ​to​ ​the​ ​development​ ​of​ ​broader​ ​legislation,​ ​and​ ​to​ ​the​ ​final​ ​outcome​ ​that would​ ​conclude​ ​the​ ​1920s. b. Technological​ ​changes​ ​and​ ​modernization​:​ ​The​ ​1920s​ ​was​ ​a​ ​decade​ ​of​ ​change, when​ ​many​ ​Americans​ ​owned​ ​cars,​ ​radios,​ ​and​ ​telephones​ ​for​ ​the​ ​first​ ​time.​ ​The cars​ ​brought​ ​the​ ​need​ ​for​ ​good​ ​roads.​ ​The​ ​radio​ ​brought​ ​the​ ​world​ ​closer​ ​to home.​ ​The​ ​telephone​ ​connected​ ​families​ ​and​ ​friends.​ ​Prosperity​ ​was​ ​on​ ​the​ ​rise in​ ​cities​ ​and​ ​towns,​ ​and​ ​social​ ​change​ ​flavored​ ​the​ ​air.​ ​A​ ​substantial​ ​growth​ ​of industry​ ​occurred​ ​in​ ​North​ ​Carolina,​ ​especially​ ​in​ ​the​ ​areas​ ​of​ ​tobacco,​ ​textiles, and​ ​furniture.​ ​Some​ ​rural​ ​farmers​ ​were​ ​leaving​ ​their​ ​farms​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​receive​ ​a regular​ ​paycheck​ ​in​ ​the​ ​factories.​ ​Unions​ ​were​ ​on​ ​the​ ​rise. c. The​ ​failure​ ​of​ ​the​ ​18th​ ​Amendment​:​ ​In​ ​1920​ ​the​ ​Eighteenth​ ​Amendment​ ​to​ ​the U.S.​ ​Constitution​ ​was​ ​passed,​ ​creating​ ​the​ ​era​ ​of​ ​Prohibition.​ ​The​ ​amendment forbade​ ​the​ ​manufacture,​ ​sale,​ ​or​ ​transportation​ ​of​ ​alcoholic​ ​beverages.​ ​Many people​ ​ignored​ ​the​ ​ban,​ ​however.​ ​In​ ​1933​ ​the​ ​amendment​ ​was​ ​abolished,​ ​and​ ​it became​ ​the​ ​only​ ​Constitutional​ ​amendment​ ​to​ ​be​ ​repealed. d. The​ ​passage​ ​of​ ​the​ ​19th​ ​Amendment​:​ ​The​ ​1920s​ ​kicked​ ​off​ ​the​ ​era​ ​of​ ​change that​ ​Americans​ ​experienced.​ ​On​ ​August​ ​18​ ​the​ ​Nineteenth​ ​Amendment​ ​was passed,​ ​giving​ ​women​ ​the​ ​right​ ​to​ ​vote. e. The​ ​expansion​ ​of​ ​the​ ​KKK​:​ ​As​ ​mentioned​ ​in​ ​the​ ​beginning​ ​of​ ​this​ ​article,​ ​the decade​ ​also​ ​represented​ ​the​ ​worst​ ​of​ ​times.​ ​In​ ​1921​ ​a​ ​revival​ ​of​ ​the​ ​white supremacist​ ​group​ ​the​ ​Ku​ ​Klux​ ​Klan​ ​(KKK)​ ​took​ ​place.​ ​The​ ​KKK​ ​was​ ​targeting Catholics,​ ​blacks,​ ​and​ ​Jews​ ​with​ ​its​ ​terrorism. f. The​ ​sudden​ ​downfall​ ​of​ ​the​ ​1920s​:​ ​Toward​ ​the​ ​end​ ​of​ ​the​ ​decade​ ​in​ ​October 1929,​ ​the​ ​stock​ ​market​ ​crashed,​ ​and​ ​America’s​ ​invested​ ​wealth​ ​suddenly​ ​lost $26​ ​billion​ ​in​ ​value.​ ​Prosperity​ ​had​ ​ended.​ ​The​ ​economic​ ​boom​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Jazz​ ​Age were​ ​over,​ ​and​ ​America​ ​began​ ​the​ ​period​ ​called​ ​the​ ​Great​ ​Depression. g. Synthesis​:​ ​The​ ​1920s​ ​represented​ ​an​ ​era​ ​of​ ​change​ ​and​ ​growth.​ ​The​ ​decade was​ ​one​ ​of​ ​learning​ ​and​ ​exploration.​ ​America​ ​had​ ​become​ ​a​ ​world​ ​power​ ​and was​ ​no​ ​longer​ ​considered​ ​just​ ​another​ ​former​ ​British​ ​colony.​ ​American​ ​culture, such​ ​as​ ​books,​ ​movies,​ ​and​ ​Broadway​ ​theater,​ ​was​ ​now​ ​being​ ​exported​ ​to​ ​the rest​ ​of​ ​the​ ​world.​ ​World​ ​War​ ​I​ ​had​ ​left​ ​Europe​ ​on​ ​the​ ​decline​ ​and​ ​America​ ​on​ ​the rise.​ ​The​ ​decade​ ​of​ ​the​ ​1920s​ ​helped​ ​to​ ​establish​ ​America’s​ ​position​ ​in​ ​respect​ ​to the​ ​rest​ ​of​ ​the​ ​world,​ ​through​ ​its​ ​industry,​ ​its​ ​inventions,​ ​and​ ​its​ ​creativity. 6. To​ ​what​ ​extent​ ​did​ ​World​ ​War​ ​I​ ​represent​ ​a​ ​turning​ ​point​ ​in​ ​the​ ​history​ ​of​ ​the United​ ​States? a. World​ ​War​ ​I​ ​represented​ ​a​ ​turning​ ​point​ ​in​ ​American​ ​history​ ​through​ ​means​ ​of technological​ ​advances,​ ​being​ ​a​ ​catalyst​ ​for​ ​WWII,​ ​and​ ​through​ ​being​ ​a​ ​world power​ ​after​ ​victory​ ​in​ ​WWI. ■ Technology​:​ ​The​ ​technology​ ​used​ ​in​ ​WWI​ ​was​ ​never​ ​before​ ​seen.​ ​They had​ ​submarines,​ ​airplanes,​ ​gas​ ​masks,​ ​even​ ​trench​ ​warfare​ ​was​ ​new. ■ Causing​ ​WWII​:​ ​The​ ​end​ ​of​ ​WWI​ ​with​ ​the​ ​Treaty​ ​of​ ​Versailles​ ​can​ ​be considered​ ​a​ ​cause​ ​of​ ​WWII.​ ​This​ ​is​ ​because​ ​the​ ​Germans,​ ​Japanese, and​ ​Italians​ ​were​ ​all​ ​dismantled​ ​after​ ​the​ ​war,​ ​at​ ​the​ ​fault​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Allies.​ ​The Germans​ ​were​ ​left​ ​in​ ​distress​ ​because​ ​they​ ​were​ ​under​ ​the​ ​impression that​ ​the​ ​treaty​ ​was​ ​going​ ​to​ ​have​ ​Wilson's​ ​14​ ​points​ ​when​ ​the​ ​reality​ ​was that​ ​only​ ​a​ ​couple​ ​ended​ ​up​ ​in​ ​the​ ​treaty.​ ​Additionally,​ ​the​ ​end​ ​of​ ​the​ ​war left​ ​Germany​ ​completely​ ​devastated.​ ​They​ ​had​ ​no​ ​economy,​ ​the government​ ​was​ ​incredibly​ ​unstable​ ​(this​ ​actually​ ​is​ ​the​ ​reason​ ​why​ ​Hitler was​ ​able​ ​to​ ​easily​ ​gain​ ​power.​ ​He​ ​used​ ​propaganda​ ​to​ ​help​ ​gain​ ​power and​ ​the​ ​people​ ​were​ ​hopeful​ ​with​ ​his​ ​promises).​ ​The​ ​Italians​ ​were​ ​given any​ ​say​ ​in​ ​helping​ ​with​ ​the​ ​treaty​ ​and​ ​this​ ​left​ ​them​ ​with​ ​little compensation.​ ​They​ ​ended​ ​up​ ​turning​ ​fascist​ ​and​ ​against​ ​the​ ​Allies.​ ​The Japanese​ ​were​ ​infuriated​ ​because​ ​they​ ​got​ ​kicked​ ​out​ ​of​ ​land​ ​and​ ​didn't trust​ ​the​ ​US​ ​and​ ​Britain​ ​taking​ ​control​ ​of​ ​Pacific​ ​islands.​ ​This​ ​was​ ​the beginning​ ​of​ ​reasons​ ​why​ ​the​ ​Japanese​ ​hated​ ​the​ ​US​ ​and​ ​ended​ ​up bombing​ ​Pearl​ ​Harbor. ■ The​ ​United​ ​States​ ​like​ ​never​ ​before​:​ ​It​ ​would​ ​be​ ​the​ ​first​ ​time​ ​the​ ​United States​ ​had​ ​been​ ​acting​ ​as​ ​a​ ​world​ ​power.​ ​At​ ​the​ ​end​ ​of​ ​the​ ​war, Americans​ ​didn't​ ​really​ ​want​ ​to​ ​be​ ​on​ ​the​ ​world​ ​stage​ ​and​ ​entered​ ​a period​ ​of​ ​Isolationism​ ​that​ ​ended​ ​up​ ​having​ ​its​ ​contradictions.​ ​But basically,​ ​Americans​ ​didn't​ ​want​ ​to​ ​be​ ​involved​ ​greatly​ ​in​ ​the​ ​world​ ​and wanted​ ​to​ ​keep​ ​to​ ​themselves​ ​during​ ​the​ ​20s. 7. To​ ​what​ ​extent​ ​was​ ​the​ ​New​ ​Deal​ ​successful​ ​in​ ​meeting​ ​and​ ​solving​ ​the challenges​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Great​ ​Depression? a. Although​ ​Franklin​ ​D.​ ​Roosevelt’s​ ​New​ ​Deal​ ​had​ ​not​ ​completely​ ​solved​ ​the entirety​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Great​ ​Depression,​ ​his​ ​attempt​ ​to​ ​stabilize​ ​the​ ​economy​ ​and provide​ ​jobs​ ​and​ ​relief​ ​to​ ​those​ ​who​ ​were​ ​suffering​ ​was​ ​commendable​ ​in​ ​solving other​ ​aspects​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Great​ ​Depression. b. In​ ​FDR’s​ ​first​ ​100​ ​days,​ ​he​ ​promised​ ​relief,​ ​recovery,​ ​and​ ​reformation​ ​in​ ​his​ ​New Deal​ ​by​ ​providing​ ​acts​ ​and​ ​administrations​ ​that​ ​could​ ​simulate​ ​the​ ​country​ ​with these​ ​three​ ​key​ ​points. ■ Reformation ● Federal​ ​Deposit​ ​Insurance​ ​Corporation​:​ ​this​ ​Act​ ​protected individual’s​ ​money​ ​for​ ​up​ ​to​ ​$5000. ● ■ Securities​ ​and​ ​Exchange​ ​Commission​:​ ​this​ ​is​ ​created​ ​to​ ​manage and​ ​investigate​ ​fair​ ​dealings​ ​with​ ​Wall​ ​Street.​ ​Needless​ ​to​ ​say,​ ​the process​ ​of​ ​“buying​ ​on​ ​margin”​ ​was​ ​eliminated. Relief ● Civilian​ ​Conservation​ ​Corporation​:​ ​gave​ ​jobs​ ​to​ ​youths​ ​in construction​ ​and​ ​environmental​ ​protection. ● Federal​ ​Emergency​ ​Relief​ ​Administration​:​ ​created​ ​even​ ​more​ ​jobs for​ ​the​ ​unemployed,​ ​including​ ​basic​ ​maintenance​ ​and beauti...
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