Don't Call Me Bird-Brained

Don't Call Me Bird-Brained - Dont Call Me Birdbrained...

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Don’t Call Me Birdbrained Joanna Dally Nicky Clayton observed one day that scrubjays were hiding scraps of food and some would come back at a later time and re-hide the scraps. Clayton, Nathan Emery, and Joanna Dally carried out several experiments to understand if these birds had a higher intelligence than previously thought. Clayton and Emery designed several experiments so that a scrubjay would either hide its food in private or in view of a ‘potential thief,’ or another bird. They found that the birds that had hidden their food while someone else was watching would come back later to re- hide the food, while the ones that hid their food in private left the hiding spot alone. When Clayton, Emery, and Dally took the experiment further, they found that scrubjays used tricks in addition to re-hiding. They learned that jays try to cache their food with a barrier blocking them from a rival’s site, or they will go for areas with less sunlight. This is indicative of an intelligence
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2008 for the course BIO 1010 taught by Professor Niedzwiecki during the Spring '08 term at Belmont.

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Don't Call Me Bird-Brained - Dont Call Me Birdbrained...

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