Lessons From the Wolf

Lessons From the Wolf - Lessons from the Wolf Jim Robbins...

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Lessons from the Wolf Jim Robbins Wolves in Yellowstone were either driven out or killed around the 1920s. Scientists noticed a severe decline in the willow trees in the following years. Some researchers thought there might be a connection between the loss of wolves and the decline in willow trees. The reason was that the wolves helped keep the elk population in check, and without the wolves, the elk population soared, which required more food resources, so any new willow tree would be eaten by the elk. Therefore, it made it almost impossible for any new willow trees to grow after the 1930s. To further prove this explanation, wolves were reintroduced in 1995 and 1996. This caused a decrease in the elk population, and researchers noticed new willow trees. Researchers also noticed changes in other parts of the Yellowstone environment. By the 1950s, beavers disappeared from Yellowstone because all of the willow trees were being devoured by the elk, so they had very limited food resources. Beavers were just one of
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2008 for the course BIO 1010 taught by Professor Niedzwiecki during the Spring '08 term at Belmont.

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Lessons From the Wolf - Lessons from the Wolf Jim Robbins...

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